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Even though it is a hoax, it is interesting to entertain "what if?". Painting the moon to increase its albedo, even if possible, would create side effects that are most unwelcome and is definitely not environmentally friendly.

A brighter moon would upset circadian rhythms of plants, animals and humans and hence seriously upset earth's ecology.

Also, radiation pressure on a higher moon albedo surface would slightly alter the moon's orbit. The effect is very small but given enough time, things like eb and flow cycles in the ocean would start to change.
Posted by LaMa on Apr 22, 2014 - 03:13 AM
From the entry: The Brighter Moon Project

that is so cool this is the best and I would have never known until my freind told me about this awsome
Posted by Ammoman on Apr 21, 2014 - 01:02 PM
From the entry: Fire Dragon

Wait. There are actually users of Apple Maps?!????
Posted by LaMa on Apr 21, 2014 - 03:31 AM
From the entry: Loch Ness Monster spotted on Apple Maps

Gary Campbell:"...the size of the object would make it likely to be Nessie." There's no arguing with that kind of logic.
Posted by Pete Byrdie on Apr 21, 2014 - 01:00 AM
From the entry: Loch Ness Monster spotted on Apple Maps

There are so many things I don't believe in, and I consider myself a very skeptical person, but for some reason I want to believe in the Loch Ness monster... rolleyes
Posted by Dana on Apr 20, 2014 - 07:24 PM
From the entry: Loch Ness Monster spotted on Apple Maps

It does seem awfully convenient that the Year of the Dragon was being ushered in. If indeed it is real, well done.
Posted by Val on Apr 17, 2014 - 04:41 PM
From the entry: Fire Dragon

Those complaints are rather hypocritical, given the large use of stock photography all over the press.

If the article had been about Paris, would the wankosphere have whined that they used a stock photo of the Eifel Tower, rather than go and snap a new one of their very own? No, of course not. So why complain now? Because of the chiiillddruuuun? Or because the tone of the article doesn't agree with the political hang-ups of Dan Wanker and his blogomates? What a load of hipster bull.
Posted by Richard Bos on Apr 17, 2014 - 06:57 AM
From the entry: Crying Child Photo Controversy

Part of my thinking is that formatting in this way will encourage me to make more frequent, shorter posts -- which don't need to be read "below the cut".
Posted by The Curator on Apr 16, 2014 - 04:24 PM
From the entry: Hoax Museum Makeover

Putting everything "below the cut" makes me not want to read below the cut.
Posted by Bill the Splut on Apr 16, 2014 - 11:59 AM
From the entry: Hoax Museum Makeover

on Facebook they also does this too especially if their post a photo of a pregnancy test on April 1st
Posted by frederick zabala on Apr 15, 2014 - 08:15 PM
From the entry: Speakerphone Pregnancy Call Terrifies Teacher

I don't understand why we can here the operator, we can hear a little of this "amy" Presumed receptionist? And we can even hear the screaming (which does sound very fake). But not once do we hear John talking? surely whatever mic is picking up the screaming should pick up Johns voice too?
Posted by Tom Moore on Apr 15, 2014 - 10:21 AM
From the entry: The Screaming Ghost in Room 209

Ooh.. nice! Very clean.
Posted by Robin Bobcat on Apr 12, 2014 - 03:14 PM
From the entry: Hoax Museum Makeover

I would not be surprised if he's right, but either way, it remains a remarkable work of art. Whether calligraphy or pseudo-calligraphy, it's a decent bit of penmanship and code-creation.

Oh, and Jutta, Schätzchen, I can't work out if you're a kook or a con artist - there is evidence enough on your site for either - but I suggest you don't give up your day job.
Posted by Richard Bos on Apr 12, 2014 - 06:28 AM
From the entry: Is the Voynich manuscript a modern forgery?

Mayflies, in comparison, are closely the same, but mayflies have a longer wingspan, double winged and possess longer antennae. It could possibly be photoshopped mayflies, I mean, the man is a director in an Art institution, or what not. I'm sure he can remove certain "tags" from edited photos.

And to the possibility of faeries existing? I would say 50/50. Why? There are so many cloning experiments that I'm sure have being going on for years. Also, there are so many "new" things that people are discovering. I put it in quotation marks because these things are already in existence; most are just rising because of earthly or weather-wise changes. Who knows? Maybe Jiminy Cricket does.
Posted by Jenny Star on Apr 12, 2014 - 02:14 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

Good idea! Done.
Posted by The Curator on Apr 11, 2014 - 08:52 AM
From the entry: Hoax Museum Makeover

I say it again. The VM is readable, written in Latin and it is no forgery! These inventors have encrypted it knew exactly what they were doing! 4 complete translated sentences are on my homepage http://www.voynich-manuskript.de Also .available in English
Posted by J. Kellner on Apr 10, 2014 - 11:30 PM
From the entry: Is the Voynich manuscript a modern forgery?

Actually, I would like to make a suggestion/request - on the main blog page, once you've logged in, could the Profile-Log Out-Contact box be moved to the top of the page, rather than buried below the blog archive?
Posted by Smerk on Apr 9, 2014 - 09:40 PM
From the entry: Hoax Museum Makeover

It does look a lot cleaner!
Posted by Smerk on Apr 9, 2014 - 09:20 PM
From the entry: Hoax Museum Makeover

How about this? Hyatt is performing a psychology experiment to see how many people accept his images show wee folk, how many think it's faked, and how many think the bufoon has mistaken a bunch of mayflies for supernatural entities. He's now eagerly scrutinizing the internet for our responses, plotting them in a graph, and drawing all manner of conclusions.
Posted by Pete Byrdie on Apr 9, 2014 - 11:23 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

Hyatt's awa' wi' the fairies, I think.
Posted by Lawrence M on Apr 8, 2014 - 02:58 PM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

That's embarrassing. Thank you for the correction - I was thinking about Michigan for some reason when writing that comment.
Posted by Cliodna on Apr 8, 2014 - 08:26 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

Cliodna: They're not in the US, they're from near Manchester, Lankyland, the (for now) United Kingdom.

And yes, I've seen photographs (and films - maybe it's in Attenborough's Bugs series?) of mayflies dancing together and catching the light exactly like that.
(By the way, "dancing"... that's entomologist-speak for "mass orgy". This scene is not suitable for pre-watershed viewing.)
Posted by Richard Bos on Apr 8, 2014 - 04:58 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

I like April Fool's day, but I think the author does have a point. Nowadays, almost every company does something stupid for April Fool's, like sending an email with some of the words written backwards. It's not even funny, much less a hoax.

Posted by Joe Schmoe on Apr 7, 2014 - 12:20 PM
From the entry: Has April Fool's Day Marketing Jumped The Shark?

My intial thought is they are midges.
Posted by Mr R on Apr 7, 2014 - 04:32 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

I must disagree with one of the above comments: They definitely do not look like they're emitting light - that's just the way bugs (or pieces of pollen) reflect in the rays of morning or evening sun.

I'm certain they are not real ("fake" would imply someone "faking" the things on purpose and I still have enough hope in humanity to wish it was an honest mistake, even though the artist comments seem to hint it was done on purpose) - if not because fairies don't exist, then because even though they appear to have the right amount of appendages none of these creatures appear to possess any joints on their arms or legs or any further anatomical details that would mark them as humanoid.

Now that I look at them they could be small blossoms floating in the wind, with the petals being the "wings" and the filaments the limbs. However as I'm not from the US I can't begin to imagine what sort of a plant would bloom like that.

That's all counting out Photoshop, of course.
Posted by Cliodna on Apr 7, 2014 - 01:51 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

Definitely fake. Tiny, gossamer winged fairies are an invention of Victorian children's books and are therefore unlikely to be seen buzzing around Rossendale being photographed by Manc professors. In this case, I suspect real fairies are creating an illusion of tiny flying picturebook fairies continuing a program of disinformation. Pesky little sods!
Posted by Pete Byrdie on Apr 5, 2014 - 03:27 PM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

FAKE. Fairies wear boots.
Posted by Luis on Apr 5, 2014 - 12:34 PM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

They don't look like mayflies, they look like something fake since some hold more humanoid shapes than others. Notice how they are all facing the camera. They also seem to be emitting light rather than being lit by it, my guess would be that this is a projection on something transparent (if Photoshop has been ruled out of course).
Posted by TheNothingHunter on Apr 5, 2014 - 11:52 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

@Richard -- Mayflies does seem to be the leading theory. But I'm still a bit suspicious that there may be an element of more deliberate photo fakery here. Because some of those things look very humanoid. A bit too humanoid for mayflies.

Though, on the other hand, I'm definitely no bug expert!
Posted by The Curator on Apr 5, 2014 - 10:16 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

They're mayflies. HTH; HAND.

Not surprised that none of those Lankies spotted this right away, but slightly disappointed at Our Esteemed Editor.
Posted by Richard Bos on Apr 5, 2014 - 09:56 AM
From the entry: The Rossendale Fairies

People who do (or refrain from doing) things only because a twitfacehoo article told them to are greater fools.
It's quite possible to read something, yet not comply with the instructions therein. Yes, even if it's on tha intartubes.
Posted by Richard Bos on Apr 5, 2014 - 09:42 AM
From the entry: Why doesn't America read anymore?

I quite agree, Smerk. Emus don't need teeth to be agressive, ornery bastards. I normally love birds of all kinds, but I'll make an exception for emus.
Posted by Richard Bos on Apr 5, 2014 - 09:21 AM
From the entry: Scary Emu

Yeah, emus are scary enough with adding in shark teeth!
Posted by Smerk on Apr 4, 2014 - 11:10 PM
From the entry: Scary Emu

People who read only headlines are setting themselves up to looking like a fool.
Posted by TMB on Apr 4, 2014 - 04:10 PM
From the entry: Why doesn't America read anymore?

Seems emus don't have sharks' teeth. Seems they do have glazed, cold shark-like eyes, if the picture is to be believed. No wonder Rod Hull had so much trouble controlling his.
Posted by Pete Byrdie on Apr 4, 2014 - 12:42 AM
From the entry: Scary Emu

Now everyone has had some fun,It's time to get the real story.
Just a few colonies have survived and they are in dense remote bushland.
Most attacks on people are thourght to be acccidently, that's why so many have lived to tell the tale.
Vegemite was developed by C.S.I.R.O. in 1930 and has saved many Aussies since.
THEY FACE EXTINCTION and wthout help will be lost forever.
SAVE THE DROP BEARS!!!
KEVIN
(The Drop Bear Preservation Society)
Posted by KEVIN on Mar 28, 2014 - 10:09 PM
From the entry: Drop Bear

Is it just me, or does his head look disproportionately large?
Posted by Bruce Carroll on Mar 27, 2014 - 02:45 PM
From the entry: 17 going on 41

Great piece of historical detective work. Thanks a bunch!

Too bad this will never make it into German Wikipedia for you're not a printed source and original research is not allowed. :(
Posted by Krischn on Mar 21, 2014 - 12:20 PM
From the entry: What's the earliest German reference to April Fool's Day?

I also enjoy reading this blog and seeing the hoaxes from the comfort of my home. smile However, the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners actually does have a fraud museum in Austin, TX (http://www.acfe.com/fraud-museum.aspx). Every year at the annual convention they bring a traveling exhibit with lots of great displays from it. It is pretty neat to see some of these historic artifacts in person!
Posted by Erin on Mar 21, 2014 - 11:30 AM
From the entry: History of Formosa on display

Who paid for his house/property/car for that time? No friends at all didn't come to get him? I'm sure he told them before he went under ground.. but it's just unrealistic to think it's real.
Posted by chad on Mar 20, 2014 - 01:53 PM
From the entry: Man emerges from Y2K bunker after 15 years

If you think the cost of acquiring such artifacts would be prohibitive, image the cost of the security measures required to protect them, and the psychological burden of being responsible for them. Fakes of fakes would be in keeping with the museum's theme. I would love a genuine hoax museum to exist, but one of the benefits of the internet is that it doesn't have to. The exhibits are available for people to see, but through a glass screen rather than the glass of a case. Perhaps, one day, this site may host interactive 3D models of Fiji mermaids, jackalopes and flying saucers, and downloadable films and ebooks of bigfoots and formosan memoirs. For now, your work is invaluable, so keep it up!
Posted by Pete Byrdie on Mar 15, 2014 - 02:11 PM
From the entry: History of Formosa on display

Dear Sirs, Umberto Eco is not the only intellectual in Bologna, we've got a lady called Clelia Sedda who is more cute! We looking forward to seeing you next year
Posted by Paola on Mar 13, 2014 - 01:46 AM
From the entry: Error Day

At last! It's the source for the Monty Python sketch (in their first German episode) of the Frenchman who had not been to the toilet for 5 years.
Posted by Baccar Wozat on Mar 11, 2014 - 09:42 PM
From the entry: Martha Nasch -- the woman who didn't need to eat or drink

Mike -- I agree with your diagnosis. Would have been interesting if there was a follow-up about her, but I couldn't find anything.
Posted by The Curator on Mar 11, 2014 - 09:15 PM
From the entry: Martha Nasch -- the woman who didn't need to eat or drink

Martha's statement that she feels like her body is petrified reminds me of case studies that I've read about a condition called "Cotard Syndrome". It's a disorder in which people suffer from a delusion in which they believe that they are dead, or don't really exist. It is often accompanied by other delusions, such as that one's organs or blood are missing, or that one's own body is decomposing. It seems plausible that if Martha had Cotard Syndrome, she could have suffered from a delusion that she had not eaten in years.
Posted by Mike on Mar 10, 2014 - 06:41 AM
From the entry: Martha Nasch -- the woman who didn't need to eat or drink

Entering* bloody autocorrect
Posted by Natalie on Mar 9, 2014 - 05:15 AM
From the entry: The Screaming Ghost in Room 209

Just a thought, the security guard would of had his flash light on before angering the room as most hotel room electric runs off the key card, not sure if I believe this to be real or not but it gave me gooseys
Posted by Natalie on Mar 9, 2014 - 05:12 AM
From the entry: The Screaming Ghost in Room 209

I will note that the 'Human Barbie', the woman who's had extensive plastic surgery to look like a doll, is going to be switching to a Bretharian diet... *shakes head*
Posted by Robin Bobcat on Mar 7, 2014 - 07:37 PM
From the entry: Martha Nasch -- the woman who didn't need to eat or drink

The net is and will always be rife with those who re-post 'stories' without any forethought as the story conforms with their beliefs.
Posted by Mr R on Mar 3, 2014 - 06:31 AM
From the entry: Operation Cat Nip Confusion

I am truely surprised that it does come from a NASA video: it has some very sloppy errors (like the auroral oval being centered on the true pole rather than on the geomagnetic pole).
Posted by LaMa on Mar 1, 2014 - 11:55 AM
From the entry: Aurora From Space