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The Hoax Museum Blog
Hoaxes, mischief, and misinformation throughout history
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The boy with the golden tooth, 1593
Can a bar of soap between your sheets ease muscle cramps?
Swiss peasants harvest spaghetti from trees, 1957

Vilcabamba, the town of very old people, 1978
The Hoaxing Hitchhiker, 1941
Princess Caraboo, servant girl who became a princess, 1817
Brief History of Triple-Decker Buses
Eccentric's last prank, 66 years after his death, 1900
Iceberg floats into Sydney Harbor, 1978
Swiss peasants harvest spaghetti from trees, 1957
Missing Stories at New York Times
Posted by The Curator on Thu Jul 10, 2003
Last week everyone was linking to this spoof about the missing Weapons of Mass Destruction. It even managed to become the first item displayed if you typed in 'Weapons of Mass Destruction' on Google (though Google has since changed that). In the same spirit, here's a spoof page about Jayson Blair and the New York Times.
Categories: Journalism, Websites Comments (0)
Puppy Love
Posted by The Curator on Thu Jul 10, 2003
It sounded awful. Five puppies thrown onto the highway from a moving car. Tracy Lloyd claimed that she managed to save one of them, while other motorists scooped up the other four. Turns out the whole tale was bogus. Lloyd wasn't allowed to keep pets in her apartment, so she had made up a sob-story to convince her landlord to bend the rules for her. Her story was exposed when the person who sold the dog to her saw Lloyd telling about the highway incident on tv.
Categories: Animals, Con Artists Comments (2)
Baby Ink Perpetrators Found
Posted by The Curator on Thu Jul 10, 2003
David Emery, of About.com's Urban Legends and Folklore page, found out that the Baby Ink tattoo parlor was an April Fool's day joke created by a couple of San Diego DJs. The DJs boast about the prank on their website (you need to scroll about halfway down to find the reference).
Categories: Birth/Babies, Websites Comments (0)
The Mystery of Splat Solved
Posted by The Curator on Thu Jul 10, 2003
Finally an answer to the riddle of 'what is Splat' that sounds like it's probably correct. According to John Lundberg of circlemakers.org, Splat was a sculpture created by the British artist John Isaacs in the mid 1990s.
Categories: Art, Gross, Photos/Videos Comments (0)
The Anniversary of Roswell
Posted by The Curator on Wed Jul 09, 2003
On July 8, 1947, 56 years ago today, the Roswell Daily Record made UFO history by announcing on its front page the discovery by the army of a flying saucer in the Roswell region. The army soon retracted its statement that it had discovered a flying saucer, leading to ever-growing suspicion of a cover-up. Here's a transcript of the 1947 article.
Tattoos for Kids
Posted by The Curator on Wed Jul 09, 2003
Here's the latest hoax website making the rounds: Baby Ink, a tattoo parlor for kids. The site claims that any kid over the age of six months is allowed to get a tattoo as long as their parent signs a consent form. But I don't believe that's right. That would be a bit like saying kids are allowed to smoke or drink alcohol as long as their parents consent to it. No, I think you have to be 18 or over to get a tattoo (or is it 16 and over?). The site lists a San Diego location that's quite near to where I live. I think I'll drive by and see what's actually there.
Categories: Birth/Babies, Websites Comments (1)
Carl Spangler
Posted by The Curator on Mon Jul 07, 2003
A reporter at the Roswell Daily Record gets fired for printing a quote he claimed to have gotten from a groundskeeper at a local golf course named 'Carl Spangler.' In reality, the quote came from Bill Murray's character in Caddyshack, 'Carl Spackler.' The quote referred to a new type of hybrid grass developed by the groundskeeper that had this amazing feature: "you can play 36 holes on it in the afternoon, take it home and just get stoned to the bejeezus-belt that night on the stuff."
Categories: Entertainment Comments (0)
Defacers Challenge
Posted by The Curator on Mon Jul 07, 2003
I haven't yet heard of any websites being defaced as part of today's Defacers' Challenge. Perhaps it was a hoax after all.
Categories: Technology Comments (0)
Cassius Clay and the Phantom Punch
Posted by The Curator on Mon Jul 07, 2003
Did Sonny Liston throw fights to Cassius Clay in 1964 and 1965? Many feel that Clay's 1965 victory, in particular, was prearranged, with Liston falling to the mat in the first round following a "phantom punch." Mike Dunn, of EastSideBoxing.com discusses the lingering controversy.
Categories: Sports Comments (0)
Who is the real Saddam Hussein?
Posted by The Curator on Mon Jul 07, 2003
An audio broadcast being aired on Al-Jazeera purports to be the voice of Saddam Hussein delivering a message to the Iraqi people. As usual, it has left everyone wondering if it really is Saddam's voice, or just someone impersonating him. This recalls how everyone wondered whether the man in the video broadcast shown during the war was actually Hussein, or one of his doubles.
Categories: Military Comments (0)
Perpetual Motion Machine
Posted by The Curator on Sun Jul 06, 2003
Sandeep Acharya has shared with me his blueprints for building a machine that can convert magnetic energy into mechanical energy. He promises that it really works. Check it out for yourself.
Categories: Free Energy Comments (0)
Happy Birthday, P.T. Barnum!
Posted by The Curator on Sun Jul 06, 2003
America's greatest showman, Phineas Taylor Barnum, born July 5, 1810, celebrates his 193rd birthday today. Happy Birthday, Barnum! In his autobiography Barnum had this to say about his birthday: My first appearance upon this stage was on the 5th day of July, Anno Domini 1810. Independence Day had gone by, the cannons had ceased to thunder forth their remembrances of our National Anniversary, the smoke had all cleared away, the drums had finished their rattle, and when peace and quiet were restored, I made my debut. This propensity of keeping out of harm's way has always stuck by me. Barnum was responsible for many hoaxes. Among his more famous ones were Joice Heth (billed as the...
Categories: History Comments (0)
The Taughannock Giant
Posted by The Curator on Sat Jul 05, 2003
July 4, 1879 a giant stone man (weight: 800 pounds; height: seven feet) was unearthed near Ithaca, New York (suspiciously close to Cardiff, New York). He was soon dubbed the Taughannock Giant. The stone man was described by a commentator as "a human figure lying on its back, arms nearly straight and the legs crossed at the ankle... well proportioned with the exception of the feet, which appear more like those of an ape." Scientists pronounced it an authentic fossilized man. In reality, it was the handiwork of one Ira Dean who had carved it in his basement. For the complete story, check out the
Categories: History Comments (0)
If you hear a baby crying… Don’t Open the Door
Posted by The Curator on Sat Jul 05, 2003
Here's a creepy email that's been making the rounds for at least half a year. It was sent to me by a visitor who wants to know if it's a hoax. Yes, it is. There have been no reported instances of serial killers using this particular modus operandi:Someone just told me that her friend heard a crying baby on her porch the night before last, and she called the police because it was late and she thought it was weird.The police told her "Whatever you do, DO NOT open the door." The lady then said that it sounded like the baby had crawled near a window, and she was worried that it would crawl to the street and get run over. The policeman said, "We already have a...
Woman stalks herself
Posted by The Curator on Fri Jul 04, 2003
Here's an odd story: an assistant professor at LSU is accused of sending threatening letters to herself.
Categories: Identity/Imposters Comments (0)
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All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.