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Yellow Lines Painted Under Parked Car
imageimageNasser Khan left his car in what he was sure was an unmarked section of road. He was understandably bemused to return the next morning only to find yellow lines beneath his car and a ticket for illegal parking on his windscreen.

CCTV footage showed workmen crouching beneath the car to paint in the lines, whilst a traffic warden waited to write the ticket.

It appears that the machinery used to paint the lines damaged the tyres on Mr Khan's car, which were then declared unroadworthy by a local garage. Salford City Council have quashed the ticket, but refuse to pay for damages to his car.

A witness to the odd event, who works in a neighbouring building, said: "We saw a group of workmen and two traffic wardens surround the car for several minutes. One of the workmen came back and crouched under the car to paint the yellow line, and then the traffic warden issued the ticket. A friend of mine caught the whole thing on his mobile phone as we thought the driver might need evidence to contest the ticket."
Categories: Law/Police/Crime, Miscellaneous
Posted by Boo on Wed Oct 04, 2006
Comments (16)
Not only should the ticket be quashed and damages to car made, but also payment for 'pain and suffering'. This is absolutely absurd.
Posted by hulitoons  in  Abingdon, Maryland  on  Wed Oct 04, 2006  at  11:58 AM
Was the workman trying to make a point? If he was, I am utterly not following. shut eye
Posted by Dily  in  West Virginia  on  Wed Oct 04, 2006  at  01:02 PM
Sounds like a personal vendetta to me. Weird. Shouldn't they have put up signs beforehand to warn people not to park there on the day it was going to be painted or something?
Posted by thephrog  on  Wed Oct 04, 2006  at  02:30 PM
A similar thing happened to me once.

I was in a large restricted parking lot where I worked. I had gotten in late and parked in the far corner of a pretty full lot. When I came out my car was in a triangular area that had been marked as "No Parking" with a sign, cones and temporary tape.

I remember thinking how was I to get out of the area without ruining the tape. Then I got to my car and saw a parking ticket!! I appealed and got rid of the ticket but only after a long conversation with the person in charge of tickets (they at first assured me that my story "could not have happened" and said they normally require photographic evidence to waive tickets). After insisting to the stories' absurd truth, they finally relented thankfully.
Posted by Floormaster Squeeze  in  Spring Hill, MA  on  Wed Oct 04, 2006  at  03:04 PM
Same thing happened to me parked outside Harrods in a residence permit area. They put up tape and no parking signs after we had parked there and then they towed the car. Luckily CCTV footage had captured it all. Even the policemen had a laugh about that one.
Posted by Merve  in  london/athens/istanbul  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  02:36 AM
Once when I parked my car near campus they later chained up the parking lot so I couldn't get out, though they didn't give me a ticket. I went into a local resteraunt and they had a key to the padlock on the chain to get my car out.

Once I got a ticket on campus because my meter ran out, but it didn't actually run out. It was broken, but didn't yet have an out of order sign on it. I tried contesting it and was told that I should have noticed that it was broken when I put the money in it. I ended up still having to pay for that one.

I actually got a parking ticket today on campus for parking in an area where I can legally park. I have a parking pass that lets me park there and I've done it every single day this year and last year. I'm going to try to contest it, but I bet they're going to make some excuse saying I didn't have the pass in plain view or something.

I hate campus traffic police.
Posted by Razela  in  Chicago, IL  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  03:34 AM
I think British Traffic Wardens are worse. Like hawks they are.
Posted by Merve  in  london/athens/istanbul  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  03:42 AM
I've tried it as well. At the street I live they put up "no parking signs" and just after the police went down the row and isssued tickets to all the cars. I contested and got the ticket waived but many of my neighbors just payed.
Posted by Mikkel  in  Copenhagen  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  07:16 AM
Something similar happened to me, back when I was driving a big rig. I was delivering at a grocery warehouse in Kansas City. After I docked my truck in a door, I went back to the truck to go to sleep and await unloading. When I woke up, I was LOCKED to the loading docks, the warehouse was dark and locked up, the gates were locked and the alarms were set. Took hours to get out of there. Some people will do anything to get off work ontime, and in the process are just plain ASSHOLES...
Posted by Christopher  in  Joplin, Missouri  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  07:23 AM
It looks to me as if they had done some work on this section of road that had removed the previously painted lines.

The driver of this car was parking in a section of road that was clearly marked (except for the 20 feet or so he parked alongside) as a no parking zone. So, they did what only a clueless government agency could do....

I don't see how they could have damaged his car painting lines though...
Posted by coit  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  08:49 AM
It was the machine they used. The ones I've seen look sort of like push-mowers, only larger. I can see how scraping that against your car would do some dmg.
Posted by Maegan  in  Tampa, FL - USA  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  02:04 PM
That is terrible.And I thought the London parking was bad.

The ticket should be quashed anddamages paid.
Posted by J  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  02:44 PM
I have seen roads with small stretches of parking between stretches of no-parking, so unless there was some other warning designating this stretch as no-parking, he probably wasn't breaking any law by parking there. Since the painter damaged the tires, the local government of which he was the agent is legally responsible for the damages. Probably. I have some slight familiarity with American law but none with British and there could be some protection for a stupid government employee.
Posted by Christopher Cole  in  Tucson, AZ  on  Thu Oct 05, 2006  at  07:14 PM
Although...If the vehicle owner has insurance & has a comp/coll covg on his policy - the gov't agency may be refusing to may dmgs, b/c his vehicle is going to be repaired REGARDLESS & the insured is only responsible for his ded. If the dmg is less than his ded...the guy may be trying to get reimbursed for rental charges while his vehicle is being repaired, etc. I can understand why they would not accept responsibility to pay it. Parking in a public street is basicly a gamble. When you hit a pothole & blow your tire out - the city does not repair your tire, or the dmg to your car.
Posted by Maegan  in  Tampa, FL - USA  on  Fri Oct 06, 2006  at  11:40 AM
Cars that are parked in the road where work has been done, such as line painting, can be legally moved by hoisting them up onto a trailer, and then replacing them. I presume that the damage was done to the car when they moved it.
Posted by Nona  in  London  on  Fri Mar 02, 2007  at  07:48 AM
Talking parking tickets: A co-worker of mine in Australian Telecom used to just take any tickets he'd been given and put them on another car.
He said he was amazed how often the person wouldn't check the ticket and end up paying his fine.
The lesson from that is check the ticket!
Posted by Joel B1  in  Hobart, Tasmania  on  Fri Feb 06, 2009  at  12:10 AM
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