The Museum of Hoaxes
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The Great Electric Sugar Swindle, 1884
The Great Wall of China Hoax, 1899
Jennifer Love Hewitt's Disappearing Breasts
Fake Fish Photos
Female thieves hide money in their bras, 1950
The most sacred relic: the Holy Foreskin, circa 800 AD
The Man-Eating Tree of Madagascar Hoax, 1874
Fake Photos of Very Large Animals
Stotham, Massachusetts: the town that didn't exist, 1920
Swiss peasants harvest spaghetti from trees, 1957
Vinegaria
Back in 1939, Lee M. Roberts won the University of California lying contest with the following discussion of the nation of Vinegaria:

The Vinegarians are a peculiar people whose government has existed largely on the income from a national pickle monopoly. Vinegaria is ideally situated for the support of this industry as it is entirely underlain with large subterranean caves. Pickle farmers plant cucumber seeds on roofs of caves and they grow through the surface, avoiding the necessity for plowing the ground for planting. Through a peculiar chemical disturbance in the ocean bed the sea has an unusual briny quality — exactly right for making pickles.

Until last year only sour pickles were produced. At that time, however, a dangerous group of radicals, claiming dill pickles were better than sour ones, gained control of the government, with the sour pickles in revolt against the new regime. Sour-picklers have nearly conquered all of the country, and except for a few government supporters or 'dillies,' as they are called in the capital, Gherkin-on-the-Brine, most of the radicals are dead.

All Vinegarians are characterized by a slight green complexion and are covered by small bumps. Supporters of old-style pickles are noted for a generally sour outlook on life. Radicals, in favor of dills, are considered dull, but this was due to a typographical error in the party platform. A near-sighted typesetter used a 'u' for an 'i.'

The national flag of Vinegaria is two crossed pickles on a field of hors d'oeuvres, symbolizing the hoped-for anschluss with that industry some day.

The country's motto is 'Preserve our national product,' and the usual answer to 'How are you?' is 'Oh, I'm feeling brine, thank you.'

I've always wondered how pickles are grown. Now I know!

There's a Lee M. Roberts, UC Berkeley grad, who currently teaches at Indiana-Purdue University in Fort Worth, but it can't be the same guy because he would have to be over 90 now. His son, perhaps?
Categories: Folklore/Tall Tales, Food
Posted by The Curator on Fri Aug 09, 2013
Comments (1)
Maybe IU-PU in Fort Wayne?
Posted by chris dowden  in  United States  on  Wed Aug 21, 2013  at  03:46 PM
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