The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
The Diaphote, a television hoax, 1880
The Case of the Vanishing Belly Button, 1964
The Cradle of the Deep, a literary hoax, 1929
Stotham, Massachusetts: the town that didn't exist, 1920
Eccentric's last prank, 66 years after his death, 1900
Script of Casablanca rejected, 1982
Man flies by own lung power, 1934
The most sacred relic: the Holy Foreskin, circa 800 AD
Dead Body of Loch Ness Monster Found, 1972
The Hoaxing Hitchhiker, 1941
The Script Kiddies Strike Again
There's a long history of hoaxers finding ways to slip fake stories into newspapers. Back in 1864 Joseph Howard tried to manipulate the New York stock market by sending fake Associated Press telegrams to newspaper offices. The telegrams claimed Lincoln had decided to conscript an extra 400,000 men into the Union army. Several papers printed the fake news. The stock market panicked, because the news suggested the Civil War was going to drag on for a lot longer, and Howard (who had invested heavily in gold) made a nice profit.

During the 1870s and 1880s, Joseph Mulhattan (a very odd character) made a kind of career out of tricking newspapers into printing fake stories. One of his more notorious hoaxes was when he fooled papers into reporting that a giant meteor had fallen in Texas. And on April Fool's Day 1915, a worker in the printing press of the Boston Globe surreptitiously made a minor alteration to the front page of the paper, lowering its price from Two Cents per Copy to One cent.

Technology changes, but the hoaxes remain much the same. And so yesterday a group of pranksters calling themselves The Script Kiddies (or TH3 5CR1PT K1DD3S) managed to hack into the Twitter feed of NBC News and posted a series of fake newsflashes. The first of these announced: "Breaking News! Ground Zero has just been attacked. Flight 5736 has crashed into the site, suspected hijacking. more as the story develops."

Obviously NBC News didn't much appreciate this. Their Twitter account was soon taken offline and the fake messages deleted.

The Script Kiddies perpetrated a similar stunt back in July when they hacked into the Twitter account of Fox News and posted tweets claiming President Obama was dead.

According to an interview they conducted with Think magazine, The Script Kiddies see themselves as anti-corporate activists, and they intend their pranks to embarrass and annoy the corporations they target.
Categories: Identity/Imposters, Journalism, Pranks
Posted by The Curator on Mon Sep 12, 2011
Comments (1)
Yeah, see.. doing something like that is just plain *rude*... If you're going for twitter-based vandalism or the like, don't go around shouting fire in the theater.

You claim to write scripts? Fine. Write scripts. Make it so that the twitter feed runs through an entire dictionary, one word (with definitons) at a time, but very, very fast. Post dirty limericks. Be CREATIVE...

I wonder if they know that in hacker nomenclature, a 'script kiddie' is the lowest form of hacker, considered a user with a couple toys someone else wrote? Meh.

Posted by Robin Bobcat  in  Californian Wierdo  on  Mon Sep 12, 2011  at  09:45 PM
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