The Museum of Hoaxes
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The disumbrationist art hoax, 1924
The Lovely Feejee Mermaid, 1842
Burger King's Left-Handed Whopper Hoax, 1998
Monkeys pick cotton, a 19th-century urban legend
The Cottingley Fairies, 1917
Old-Time Photo Fakery, 1900 to 1919
The Hoaxing Hitchhiker, 1941
The Great Space Monkey Hoax, 1953
The Instant Color TV Hoax, 1962
Taco Bells buys the Liberty Bell, 1996
The Fur-Bearing Lobster
Status: Real
image Science has long recognized the existence of the fur-bearing trout, which lives in the rivers and lakes of North America. Now its Pacific cousin has been found: the fur-bearing lobster (scientific name Kiwa hirsuta). According to the BBC, "A US-led team found the animal last year in waters 2,300m (7,540ft) deep at a site 1,500km (900 miles) south of Easter Island, an expert has claimed. Details appear in the journal of Paris' National Museum of Natural History."

So what is the purpose of the fur? Scientists speculate that "the 'hairy' pincers contained lots of filamentous bacteria... The bacteria detoxify poisonous minerals from the water, allowing K. hirsuta to survive around the vents."

An interesting theory, but it seems to me more logical to assume that its luxuriant coat developed to protect it from the cold waters of the depths, as is the case with the fur-bearing trout.

[Note: Despite what the above text might imply, fur-bearing trout are a tall-tale. Furry lobsters are real.]

(Thanks to Kathy for the link)
Categories: Animals, Folklore/Tall Tales
Posted by The Curator on Wed Mar 08, 2006
Comments (14)
Looks like a really wicked new breed of tic, probably evolved in the nasty muff of some loose, aging, desperate, washed up pop star. Huh, how is Madonna doing?
Posted by Lonewatchman  on  Thu Mar 09, 2006  at  01:49 AM
Alex should read the article next time before forming opinions. The crab hangs around hydrothermal vents. Hydrothermal vents are hot, extremely so. Thus, the opinion that the fur keeps the crab warm in these extremely hot areas is weakened somewhat. Just a thought though.
Posted by Collaborator  in  Phoenix, AZ  on  Thu Mar 09, 2006  at  02:14 AM
The thing is also blind, perhaps the hair act as feelers so the little guy can "see" where he's going?

Looks tasty, how long before this ends up at Red Lobster?
Posted by Chris Carlisle  on  Thu Mar 09, 2006  at  10:46 AM
The part about the fur keeping the lobster warm was a joke, Collaborator. I was making an allusion to the legend of the fur-bearing trout and why it is said to have its fur.
Posted by The Curator  in  San Diego  on  Thu Mar 09, 2006  at  10:48 AM
I wondered if you were aware of this snail native to parts of england. The Hairy Snail (Trichia hispida). http://www.biopix.dk/Species.asp?Language=en-us&Searchtext=Trichia hispida&Category=Bloeddyr
Posted by Iridium  in  Middlesbrough  on  Thu Mar 09, 2006  at  02:54 PM
I wondered if you were aware of this snail native to parts of england. The Hairy Snail (Trichia hispida). http://www.biopix.dk/Species.asp?Language=en-us&Searchtext=Trichiahispida&Category=Bloeddyr

Sorry I'll try that link again.
Posted by Iridium  in  Middlesbrough  on  Thu Mar 09, 2006  at  02:56 PM
Ok sorry neither of those links go to the right place Search Hairy Snail (Trichia hispida). in google images that should work. I hope wink
Posted by Iridium  in  Middlesbrough  on  Thu Mar 09, 2006  at  03:01 PM
I wonder if there's enough of these to make a nice fur coat out of before they go extinct...
Posted by Christopher in Joplin, Missouri  in  Joplin, Mo  on  Fri Mar 10, 2006  at  07:39 AM
If I had been dumb enough to be sipping coffee at the exact same time I was reading this post, I would have spewed it all over my monitor. Of course, I've heard about that happening, and I always question the foresight of somebody sipping a hot liquid just as they are reading a possibly funny or whacky item. But I digress.

I laughed because somebody took Alex seriously about the fur being for heat. Remember, kids, thermal vents or not, fur keeps animals warm by trapping AIR to create a layer of insulation against skin. This doesn't work in water, needless (?) to say. The sea otter is the exception because its fur is so silly thick that it is able to trap air for warmth and buoyancy.

Far more importantly, the animal has to warm up the trapped air, meaning the animal needs to be warm-blooded. You could zip a spacesuit around a lobster and it will remain cold forever.

One more thing - if fur was important for warmth ya think it might grow on the actual body instead of just the extremities? Just a thought.

I LOVE this web site.
Posted by DJ  on  Fri Mar 10, 2006  at  03:27 PM
HEY KIDS! CATHCH THE CRAB THATS OUR DINNER!!!!!
Posted by Eva  in  New york  on  Fri Mar 10, 2006  at  07:03 PM
DJ says "One more thing - if fur was important for warmth ya think it might grow on the actual body instead of just the extremities? Just a thought."

Well hey, maybe it's just his little claws that get cold. Didja ever think of that??? cheese
Posted by Christopher in Joplin, Missouri  in  Joplin, Mo  on  Sat Mar 11, 2006  at  11:02 PM
"Excuse me waiter!, There is a fucking Hair on my lobster... Can I have a new one?" "Sorry sir, we'll get you a hair pie free of charge." "Damn right you wil, BITCHES"
Posted by MetalTheKid  in  Texas  on  Sun Mar 12, 2006  at  12:03 PM
Check ,out this url the national geographic put out.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/03/0309_060309_yeti_crab.html
Posted by Blackomne  in  Wyoming  on  Mon Mar 13, 2006  at  12:54 PM
ya, its real i saw it on the news
Posted by vurb  on  Thu Mar 30, 2006  at  09:11 AM
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