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Man flies by own lung power, 1934
Fake Fish Photos
The Cradle of the Deep, a literary hoax, 1929
Swiss peasants harvest spaghetti from trees, 1957
Jernegan's Gold Accumulator Scam, 1898
The Stone-Age Tasaday Hoax, 1971
The Berners Street Hoax, 1810
Samsung invents the on/off switch
Vilcabamba, the town of very old people, 1978
Prankster causes volcano to erupt, 1974
Pat Robertson Can Leg Press 2000 Pounds
Status: Must be False (by reason of being physically impossible)
image Pat Robertson claims to be able to leg press 2000 pounds. If this is true, it would be a world record. Even more improbably, his trainer claims to be able to leg press 2700 pounds.

I don't know when Robertson first posted this bizarre claim on his Christian Broadcasting Network website (it's included in a sales pitch for his "age-defying protein shake"), but it came to the attention of the blogosphere on May 22 when Clay Travis wrote about it on CBS Sportsline. Putting Robertson's claim in context, Travis noted that the leg press record is held by Dan Kendra of Florida State University who pressed 1,335 pounds, causing the capillaries in his eyes to burst. Robertson, who's 76 years old, has apparently managed to beat Kendra's record by 665 pounds (without doing any damage to his eyes).

Robertson has posted a video of himself leg pressing 1000 pounds, which seems pretty remarkable (kind of unbelievable, actually), but we have to take his word for it (and the word of his trainer) that he lifted the 2000 pounds. Here's the description of how it supposedly happened:

Pat Robertson worked out at the gym on an incline leg press machine with weights up to 570 pounds. Working with his physician, who was an amazing strength trainer, he worked up to 800 pounds, then 1,000 pounds. Then one day he was able to leg press 1,500 pounds one time. Then over the succeeding months, he trained with multiple reps of 1,200 pounds, 1,300 pounds, and 1,400 pounds. One Saturday morning, his physician said, “I’ll get you bragging rights. Let’s go to 2,000 pounds.” Then he worked up multiple reps of 1,400 pounds, 1,500 pounds, 1,600 pounds, 1,700, pounds, 1,800 pounds and 1,900 pounds. When 2,000 pounds was put on the machine two men got on either side and helped push the load up, and then let it down on Mr. Robertson, who pushed it up one rep and let it go back down again.

I'm simply not willing to believe that a man his age set a leg press world record. In fact, I find it hard to believe that he even lifted 1000 pounds (he's either lifting magic weights, or using a lifewave patch). As Big Gary wrote to me in an email, if this isn't a hoax, I'll drink his age-defying protein shake.
Categories: Sports
Posted by The Curator on Sat May 27, 2006
Comments (38)
I don't really believe he did it, but if he did, I tip my hat to the gym where he works out.

I had to leave a gym recently because I was doing what I call lock out lifts on a Smith Machine with close to six hundred pounds and the guy who runs the place said "that's too much weight for a guy your size and age."
Posted by John C. Anderson  in  East Moline, IL  on  Wed Oct 07, 2009  at  06:51 PM
I'm only fourteen, and i can hit over 1000, the machine i was using maxed out at that, but i think it must be possible for him to do this, being that i have only been lifting for about nine months, and started lifting on my legs about two months ago...
Posted by dude  in  illinois  on  Wed Dec 30, 2009  at  06:29 PM
I believe it. Sort of.

I used to do what I called leg presses up to 1000+ pounds when I was 17 years old and doing cross country running. If I could do it as a 17 year old scrawny female, so can he. The only problem is that, like him, I was almost definitely doing it wrong. The machine I worked with was on a gentle incline and at most I moved the weights up and down about 5-12 inches- nowhere near full leg extension. I called it '1000 pounds' based on the amount of weight which may or may not have been near the amount of actual force I was using.
Posted by Michelle  in  Tennessee  on  Thu Apr 29, 2010  at  01:49 AM
Pat Robertson doing a wonderful thing in gym.its really wonderful that Robertson who is only 76 years old and managed to beat Kendra's record by 665 pounds.
Posted by protein shakes  in  new york  on  Sat Jun 19, 2010  at  06:04 AM
2000 pounds is not a record leg press. Perhaps the person who posted this article is getting the leg press confused with the squat (which has a current world record of about 1200 pounds). The leg press is an isolated machine movement in which extremely high weight is commonly used. Top bodybuilders (who don't even train for powerlifting) can rep out over 2000 pounds easily. If you don't believe me, take a look at the link I posted below this message. It is a video of Ronnie Coleman doing reps at 2300 pounds. I am sure there are lifters who focus primarily on the leg press, and have lifts over 3000 pounds.

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/2537988/ronnie_coleman_2300_lb_leg_press/
Posted by Kevin  on  Wed Jun 23, 2010  at  05:55 PM
im only 14 and i leg pressed 900 pounds
Posted by kane  in  indiana  on  Mon Jan 17, 2011  at  08:20 PM
There is a 64-year old-man in New Jersey who regularly works out with1400to 1600lbs full-range of Motion.
Posted by John  in  Cranford,New Jersey  on  Fri Mar 02, 2012  at  11:50 AM
I can rep 1400lbs on leg press 8 or 9 times and i usually do it after ive already squatted heavy so my legs are pretty fatigued. This might sound outlandish to some but for a superheavy weight powerlifter im not even really that strong. Im pretty sure i could hit 2000lbs if i trained for it for a month or two so i see no reason to not believe this guy.
Posted by Norsemanpowerlifter  in  East Texas  on  Mon Jun 18, 2012  at  12:35 PM
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