The Museum of Hoaxes
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The Gallery of Fake Viral Images
Female thieves hide money in their bras, 1950
Burger King's Left-Handed Whopper Hoax, 1998
Paul Krassner's Stereophonic Hoax, 1960
Old-Time Photo Fakery, 1900 to 1919
Cat that walked 3000 miles to find its owners, 1951
Fake Fish Photos
The Man-Eating Tree of Madagascar Hoax, 1874
Jennifer Love Hewitt's Disappearing Breasts
Swiss peasants harvest spaghetti from trees, 1957
The Oldest Ear of Corn—a fake that fooled science
From 1914 to 1934 the Smithsonian had on display an object that it described as the "oldest ear of corn" in the world. It was believed to be a piece of fossilized corn, several thousand years old, which had been acquired from a "collector of curios" in Cuzco, Peru.

The fossil corn wasn't considered to be just a curiosity. It was regarded as having real scientific importance because, as G.N. Collins noted in a 1919 article about it in the Journal of Heredity, it provided "the first tangible evidence of the geological existence of this important cultivated plant." ("A Fossil Ear of Maize," Jour. Heredity, April 1919).

It was also believed to be a previously unknown species of maize and was named Zea antiqua.


The "oldest ear of corn" is shown from different angles in the left column

It was important enough that in 1934 Roland W. Brown of the U.S. Geological Survey decided to have a closer look at it, which is when he realized that the "fossilized corn" wasn't corn at all. The object was made of clay, and it had a hollow section that contained three small, round oval pellets. It appeared to be a toy rattle.

Brown noted that, "The object is so clever a copy of an original ear of Peruvian maize that the maker must be credited with having been an artist of superior skill."

The good news was that the rattle did appear to be a genuine ancient artifact. But it was an artifact of archaeological, not biological, interest.

Categories: Science
Posted by The Curator on Fri Oct 18, 2013
Comments (1)
The last time she looked inside my fridge, my girlfriend found something similar. I told her it was of genuine scientific import, but she saw things differently.
Posted by hoaxinghal  on  Thu Oct 24, 2013  at  12:31 AM
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