The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
The Sandpaper Test, 1960
Mule elected G.O.P. committeeman, 1938
The Berners Street Hoax, 1810
Fake Fish Photos
Van Gogh's ear exhibited, 1935
The Nazi Air Marker Hoax, 1942
The Cottingley Fairies, 1917
Pierre Brassau, Monkey Artist, 1964
Samsung invents the on/off switch
The Case of the Vanishing Belly Button, 1964
Marry Our Daughter
imageMarryOurDaughter.com claims to be "an introduction service assisting those following the Biblical tradition of arranging marriages for their Daughters."

If you're in the market for a young bride, you can choose from a wide variety of choices. For instance, there's 14-year-old Kyra who:
likes the outdoors, more the open air of the beach or the desert than the woods. She would love to live somewhere away from it all. She is bright and funny and full of life and while she has little direct experience with the opposite sex we have made sure she is aware of everything she needs to know to be a good wife and mother.

Is this legal? Of course. As the site points out, "Within the United States girls can marry as young as 13 years old with parental permission, and the Bride Price is a custom of long standing, mentioned many times in the Bible, and as such is a protected religious practice."

Is the site for real? Of course it isn't. Signs that it's a hoax (in addition to the general ridiculousness of it):

a) the google ads. It's always a sure sign of a hoax when a site claiming to be a legitimate business has to stick google ads on its page. Though in this case, the owner of the site isn't even earning any money from the ads because google is only serving up public service ads.

b) The creator of the site used an anonymous proxy service to register it.

The site is loading very slowly, so you may not be able to access it. (Thanks to Farx for the link)
Categories: Sex/Romance, Websites
Posted by The Curator on Tue Sep 04, 2007
Comments (38)
Actually, on a radio show that plays from Denver, I hear them interviewing one of the meant that started this "service". It is disgusting and the radio DJs were disturbed and kept repeating that this interview was not a joke, etc. People we calling in very worried about this topic. It is actually REAL!!!!
Posted by Monica  in  Colorado  on  Fri Sep 14, 2007  at  12:09 AM
I thought it might be a police sponsored site to find people who want to do illegal things such as selling girls off who aren't their daughters to get cash. Never know with how f'd up this world is. Just a theory, though. Either way, it's hilarious.
Posted by LordofKaboom  in  Gastonia, NC  on  Sat Sep 15, 2007  at  06:50 AM
HOAX --- See the article that newsweek is putting out about the site and it's creator ---

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20781129/site/newsweek/?GT1=10357
Posted by B  in  FL  on  Wed Sep 19, 2007  at  12:25 AM
"It's always a sure sign of a hoax when a site claiming to be a legitimate business has to stick google ads on its page"

????

Google ads are a perfectly legitimate way to bring traffic to your site. Why would you say such an ignorant thing?

Maybe my biz isnt Amazon.com, but it IS legit!

Please dont make claims like that without thinking first.
Posted by pat  on  Fri Sep 21, 2007  at  01:23 PM
I have know idea if this did turn out to be a hoax but a radio station here interviewed one of the owners of this website. 93.1 Radio Now. It sure sounded real when he was talking about the site.
Posted by Heather C  in  indianapolis, in  on  Fri Sep 21, 2007  at  02:00 PM
http://feministing.com/archives/007738.html#comments

more debunking.
Posted by Anne (in Reno)  on  Mon Sep 24, 2007  at  12:31 AM
It is completely fake and I know this for a fact because some of the images on the website were taken by myself and fellow photographer friends. Stolen images, fake profiles... if they are accepting money, it is a total scam.
Posted by rhonda  on  Thu Sep 27, 2007  at  12:42 PM
rhonda, according to the reports I've read, the owner of the site claims to have gotten the photos from a service. If they were stolen, he didn't do it the service did. Presuming he isn't lying about that part of it.
Posted by Christopher Cole  in  Tucson, AZ  on  Thu Sep 27, 2007  at  03:11 PM
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