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Liquid Oxygen Skin Cream
New Scientist has flagged a product whose promoters are guilty of making a few misleading claims. It's Neaclear facial cream, and it's advertised as containing a "powerful combination of liquid oxygen, vitamins C & E, sage, chamomile, seaweed and rosemary, coconut oil, sweet almond oil and hydroquinone." The company even boasts that they're the first company "to combine stabilised liquid oxygen into all of its products." New Scientist notes that "We have certainly never heard of a skin cream that contains liquid oxygen, the temperature of which is normally somewhere below -183 °C."
Categories: AdvertisingHealth/Medicine
Posted by The Curator on Fri Sep 09, 2005
Alex, Alex, Alex. The answer is so simple that I'm surprised you can't see it. The inventors of Neaclear facial cream are using LifeWave patches to allow oxygen to remain liquid at room temperature. Those little adhesive pieces of plastic can do ANYTHING!
Posted by Cranky Media Guy  on  Fri Sep 09, 2005  at  04:41 AM
Liquid oxygen in the form of H2O. Its so obvious.
Posted by Jorge  on  Fri Sep 09, 2005  at  10:04 AM
Lifewave! I should have known it.
Posted by The Curator  in  San Diego  on  Fri Sep 09, 2005  at  10:12 AM
I also think they should rename their product "Nuclear facial cream, with liquid oxygen." They would see an explosion in sales.
Posted by The Curator  in  San Diego  on  Fri Sep 09, 2005  at  10:17 AM
Quantum Nuclear facial cream, now with liquid oxygen.
Posted by Zoe  on  Fri Sep 09, 2005  at  10:50 AM
Since liquid oxygen is usually -183 degrees C, they could even change the name to Cold Fusion facial cream.
Posted by Nat  on  Fri Sep 09, 2005  at  10:58 AM
For better performance add some liquid titanium from your bracelet. http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/forums/viewthread/139/
Posted by Captain Al  in  Vancouver Island, Canada  on  Fri Sep 09, 2005  at  12:50 PM
does it freeze the face to prevent wrinkles?
Posted by trotsky  in  Australia  on  Sat Sep 10, 2005  at  01:59 AM
All,
Thank you for your comments. Our intention is never to mislead the public since we are an ethical company. We were never contacted by newscientist.com to discuss our products or to answer their questions. We are still awaiting a response from their attorneys for their slanderous comments.

Even though we are a physician-strength skin care company, our claims are significantly less than other cosmeceuticals companies. Please feel free to check out the following web link where you will find the our science page updated:

http://www.neaclear.com/ourscience.htm

neaclear products have all undergone rigorous safety, efficacy, stability and hypoallergenicity studies. neaclear is currently conducting numerous randomized, prospective and double-blind clinical trials to further validate our products.

Unfortunately, we cannot discuss with you the oxygenation process. We understand your comments concerning liquid oxygen, and that is why the process took us over 1
Posted by Peter Pappas  in  Park Ridge, IL  on  Mon Sep 12, 2005  at  04:06 PM
"...our claims are significantly less than other cosmeceuticals companies. "

"Cosmeceuticals"?

Hee hee hee hee hee.
Posted by Big Gary, strangling with uncontrollable laughter  in  Dallas, Texas  on  Tue Sep 13, 2005  at  07:07 PM
If you could put 5% "liquid oxygen" in a skin cream (which, of course, you can't-- not at normal temperatures, anyway), why would it be good for your skin?

My skin is constantly immersed in a mixture containing about 20% gaseous oxygen, and I haven't noticed anything extraordinary happening to it.
Posted by Big Gary, strangling with uncontrollable laughter  in  Dallas, Texas  on  Tue Sep 13, 2005  at  07:11 PM
Most of the cosmeceutical companies that dominate this industry include Loreal, Neutrogena, Procter & Gamble etc. Please feel free to check out their claims. Physician-strength companies like Obagi, Laroche Posay, Skinceuticals and neaclear are redefining this industry with their data.


We do not lay claim to originating this term, but it has been around for a while and is commonly used. I googled the term cosmeceutical and hope you might find the time to check the results at the following link:

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLD,GGLD:2004-
47,GGLD:en&q=Cosmeceutical

Have a nice day and please let me know if there is anything else I can do to help you or we as a company can do better.

Best Regards,

Pete
Posted by Pete Pappas  in  Park Ridge, IL  on  Wed Sep 14, 2005  at  11:43 AM
Jolen came up with Jolen Creme Bleach a product for women safe to use and can lighten excess dark hair and skin.
Posted by yash  on  Thu Aug 02, 2007  at  08:46 AM
So, does anyone else see Neaclear and think Nuclear? Neaclear-Nuclear... Try pronouncing Neaclear diffirent.
Posted by Steven  on  Sat Nov 08, 2008  at  08:35 PM
I apriciate your conversation...

I am a manufacturer and distributor of the skin care range namely DERMACOS in Pakistan...

I am also surprise to know that we can use the LOX in cosmetics / skin care manufacturing...

Please advice us how dose you do that... i think its quite impossible..

Regards
Irshan Ahmed
Posted by Irshan Ahme  in  Karachi, Pakistan  on  Wed Apr 29, 2009  at  02:05 PM
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