The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
Princess Caraboo, servant girl who became a princess, 1817
The Great Space Monkey Hoax, 1953
Tube of liquor hidden in prohibition-era boot, 1920s
The damp spot that hoaxed a city, 1912
September Morn, the painting that shocked the censor, 1913
Rachael Ray cooks her family and her dog
Prof. Wingard's Death Ray Hoax, 1876
What do the lines on Solo cups mean?
The Gallery of Fake Viral Images
war of the worlds
The night Martians invaded New Jersey, 1938
Insect Candy
Status: Real
image Paul Farrington emailed me with a question about the HOTLIX Insect Candy Company: "The site looks real, the products look real, there are no obvious giveaways except the sheer unbelievable grotesqueness of the very concept! What’s your take?" Well, my take is that the insect candy is definitely real, though I've never ordered any of it and submitted it to an entomologist for confirmation. (Nor do I plan to.) But there's no reason to believe the candy wouldn't be real. After all, insects are eaten in many cultures. It's only Westerners who are squeamish about eating them. A recent article in the Smithsonian's Zoogoer magazine discusses insects as food, pointing out that honey is nothing more than "bee vomit," and even notes the existence of the HOTLIX Insect Candy Company:

Although people worldwide have been enjoying edible insects since ancient times, their value—in terms of both nutrition and conservation—is often overlooked by the modern Western world...
An estimated 2,000 insect species are consumed around the world, and people do not just eat insects, they relish them as delicacies. In Africa, caterpillars and winged termites are fried and eaten as roadside snacks (after wings, legs, and bristles are removed, of course), and often considered tastier than meat. Grasshoppers and bee larvae seasoned with soy sauce are favorites in Japan, where pricey canned insects are also available. Papua New Guinea is known for its nutty-flavored sago grubs (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus papuanus or R. bilineatus), beetle larvae that inhabit dead sago palm trees and are honored at annual festivals...
Specialty food shops in Europe have started to sell insects imported from Africa. Even a U.S. company, Hotlix, sells various lollipops with embedded insects, chocolate-covered cockroaches, grubs, slugs, and grasshoppers, and mealworms in barbeque, cheddar cheese, and Mexican flavors.
Categories: Food
Posted by The Curator on Wed Jan 25, 2006
Comments (34)
any1 ever had choclate covered roaches ? or choc mice tastee!!! that stuffs da bomb a store here in suzab had this promo where you eat this choclate dung beetle it waz really tastee though i kno it sounds discusting but...try it SEE 4 YOURSELF cheers from suzab
Posted by star flex master12  in  suzbawawi S america  on  Tue Aug 22, 2006  at  10:16 PM
big surprise
Posted by .  in  .  on  Tue Sep 25, 2007  at  07:59 AM
I simply can't understand why people find eating bugs so gross. I have eaten crickets, scorpions, and silkworms, including many others. They taste just like seafood!
Posted by Thomas Cali  on  Sat Sep 29, 2007  at  06:37 PM
This is a cool one to!
http://www.hotlixeurope.com
Posted by Mack  in  Norway  on  Sat Feb 23, 2008  at  09:49 AM
Comments: Page 2 of 2 pages  < 1 2
Commenting is no longer available for this post.
All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.