The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
Lord Gordon-Gordon, robber of the robber barons, 1871
Life discovered on the moon, 1835
Dog wins art contest, 1974
Female thieves hide money in their bras, 1950
Brief History of Triple-Decker Buses
Burger King's Left-Handed Whopper Hoax, 1998
The Lovely Feejee Mermaid, 1842
Actress who claimed she was kidnapped by puritans, 1950
Jean Gauntt, the Immortal Baby, 1939
The disumbrationist art hoax, 1924
Elephants—Larger Than The Moon, and other Who Wants To Be A Millionaire Hoaxes
As Chris Tarrant departs from the UK version of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, The Express takes the opportunity to review the history of the quiz show, including some of the hoaxes and frauds associated with it.

For example, the show spawned an internet meme of screenshots of contestants getting absurdly simple questions wrong. Many of these are hoaxes, such as the most famous one which seems to show contestant Fiona Wheeler (not Kathy Evans as some email captions claim) deciding that an elephant is larger than the moon.


In reality, Wheeler was asked "What is the everyday name for the trachea?" (Breastbone, Windpipe, Kneecap, or Heelbone). And she got the answer right, going on to win £32,000. A screenshot of her answering this question was posted on ukgameshows.com, and someone altered it to create the elephant version.


But sometimes contestants really have gotten absurdly easy questions wrong. Such as the French contestant who asked the audience for help on figuring out which celestial body orbited the earth: the sun, moon, Mars or Venus. The audience chose "sun," so that's what he answered. Laughter from the audience suggests some of them may have been pranking him.


Who Wants To Be A Millionaire also has a history of allegations of cheating and game rigging. For instance, £1million prize winner Charles Ingram was convicted of cheating by having an accomplice cough whenever the correct answer was read.

And many accused the producers of the show of feeding contestant Judith Keppel easy questions, so that they could have a big winner (and thus big ratings), thereby overshadowing the final episode of the BBC sitcom One Foot In The Grave.
Categories: Entertainment
Posted by The Curator on Thu Oct 24, 2013
Comments (0)
There are no comments yet for this post.



Smileys






Note: By becoming a member you can bypass the captchas, and also post in the Hoax Forum. But because the automated member registration process was being overwhelmed by spammers, we're now forced to sign-up new members by request only. Email "curator at museumofhoaxes.com" if you'd like to be a member. Or use our Contact Form.
All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.