The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
Pierre Brassau, Monkey Artist, 1964
Eccentric's last prank, 66 years after his death, 1900
Van Gogh's ear exhibited, 1935
The Cradle of the Deep, a literary hoax, 1929
Baby Yoga, aka Swinging Your Kid Around Your Head
A black lion: real or fake?
Adolf Hitler Baby Photo Hoax, 1933
Vilcabamba, the town of very old people, 1978
BMW's April Fool's Day Hoaxes
The Berners Street Hoax, 1810
Earn Money Working at Home—Become an Envelope Elf!
The consumer affairs office of the state of Massachusetts has created a series of phony websites designed to teach people how to avoid online scams. The sites advertise products such as work-at-home deals, weight-loss products, and free trips. If anyone tries to order something from these sites, they're directed to a page identifying it as a scam and telling them how they could have spotted the scam. My favorite one is the "Envelope Elf" site.


The SEC did something similar back in 2002. It created a hoax site for McWhortle Enterprises, Inc. The idea was to teach investors that just because a company has a website, that doesn't mean it's a legitimate business.

The SEC actually registered the domain name mcwhortle.com. The Massachusetts consumer affairs office, however, parked all its hoax sites at the same domain: http://topmassachusettsdeals.com. I think they should have paid the $20 and registered envelope-elf.com.
Categories: Scams, Websites
Posted by The Curator on Fri May 18, 2012
Comments (1)
Huh... Very interesting.

I'm glad to see the SEC taking action and helping people to learn how to spot scams.

Good stuff.
Posted by Steve Anderson  in  http://www.profitablepaidsurveys.com  on  Mon Jun 11, 2012  at  10:04 PM
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