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Coydogs
image Coydogs. Are they real creatures, or just the stuff of urban legend? As the name implies, a coydog would be a cross between a coyote and a dog. But according to Chrissie Henner, a biologist at the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, they're an urban legend. She says that "there has never been any physical evidence of a half-dog, half-coyote animal." Not that it would be impossible for the two species to mate and produce an offspring, just very unlikely. Though Henner also points out that the mating cycles of the two species differ: "Coyotes go in to heat between January and March and have pups in May or June, while dogs have their pups in winter." So if animal experts such as Henner are correct that there's no physical evidence of the existence of coydogs, then what exactly is the Sundance Coydogs site selling? Are these coyotes, or dogs that look coyote-like, or real coydogs?
Categories: Animals
Posted by The Curator on Tue Dec 21, 2004
Umm...people are still commenting on my posts? Oddly, the negative remarks seem to come mainly from people who take a cavalier attitude toward crossbreeds. Folks, I said specifically that I feel it's irresponsible to take in exotic animals as pets without knowing what they're all about, whether from experience or from proper research, and this includes their habits, any special needs, and so forth. If you're competent and capable of caring for such an animal, wonderful. Most people aren't. Most people, judging from what I've seen, aren't fit to own animals at all. If nothing else, take an animal you don't have any familiarity with to a veterinarian; it's a noble profession in my opinion, and I'd generally trust their judgement.

I don't approve of encouraging a casual attitude toward any kind of exotic and won't be persuaded on it. This is how I feel about any kind of pet, but it applies doubly for those we have no right to expect to behave like their domesticated relatives.

By the way, I have family from here in the South going back to before the Revolution, Clay, and I've rarely stepped out of my home state.

(((My dog has mostly German Shepards colors but many traits of a coyotee, fur, ears tail even his teeth are bigger and sharper then any german shepard pup anyone has seen. He howls like a coyotee does. He is extremly smart and well behaved. My vet didn't seem to think I was crazy when i told her what he was.)))

It sounds like you love him. I've heard of coyote dogs being a bit on the skittish side in comparison to other types of dog. Is this true in your case? Also, is there anything special your vet recommended you do for your pet? Any special meds or living arrangements or anything? I'd just like to know so I'd be able to tell as much to someone who needs the info.
Posted by Bill Mutz  in  NC  on  Thu Sep 01, 2005  at  09:50 PM
Bill, It sounds like you are not a pet lover. I can tell you from experience that most vets know nothing about dealing with a pet that has wild blood in it. You have to go to a vet that has training in pet psychology. Even dog trainers don't know how to deal with them. Yes, coydogs tend to be skittish. They don't like strangers and tend to bond closely with their human. They expect the human to keep them safe. I don't have a problem with my coydog other than that I had some trouble understanding him until he was taken to the proper vet which meant travelling to another city and going to a University Clinic that specializes in animal behavior. Life is much different now that I know what is going on but he went through three vets that didn't have a clue. I couldn't ask for a better companion and he actually behaves better than my other dog who does not have the coy in her. However, they are a little more fearful than most dogs.
Posted by MICK  in  oklahoma  on  Thu Sep 01, 2005  at  10:19 PM
Thanks for pointing that out, MICK. I was mostly going on the assumption that the average veterinarian would be more likely to know what to do with a coydog than the average person, and I'd like to think that one would have the sense to direct a person who just came into the possession of a coydog to the appropriate specialist. Perhaps I'm just putting too much faith in them, but my main point was that letting one's veterinarian know that one hasn't had any experience with a particular type of animal would be at least ten times better than letting them go on the assumption that one's had experience with such animals and knows what to do. To be clear, I agree with you.

Anyway, be well.
Posted by Bill Mutz  in  NC  on  Fri Sep 02, 2005  at  11:58 AM
I can assure you that Coy-Dogs are very real. I have owned two of them. We just had to put the oldest one down (cancer) at the ripe old age of 15 (human years). He was such a wonderful pet that I was always searching for another one of the same breed. He was half Coyote and half Chow. His mother was a pure bred Chow and his father was a Coyote. He had all the markings and fur of a coyote, as well as a Coyote's gate, but he had the purple tongue of the Chow. I've seen Coyote's in the wild and, aside from the size, they looked identical to my dog. My dog was a bit more muscular, probably because he was fed regularly and didn't have to hunt for food. He was wonderful with people as long as he knew them, but made a great guard dog as he was always wary of strangers. My wife got him in New Mexico, when she was driving tractor trailers for a living. He spent the first 3 years of his life with her on the road. He would sleep in the back while she was driving and sit in the passenger seat and guard the truck at night while she slept.

My second Chow-Coyote mix came from Las Vegas. His mother was a pet Coyote, and his father was a Chow. He looks nothing like a Coyote, possibly because the males tend to take the characteristics of the father (I don't know this for a fact, it's merely speculation.) He has more of a Chow type face and is black in color. His tongue is purple spotted. He doesn't have a viscious bone in his body. While he will bark at strangers, it's only to atract their attention because they are someone who hasn't had the good sense to pet him yet. I am currently in the market for another Coyote-Chow mix (male un-neutered) because the young one is somewhat lonely. He could use a playmate. If anyone knows where I might find such a dog, I would greatly appreciate any info you might have.
Posted by Michael Welch  on  Sun Oct 23, 2005  at  10:43 AM
Michael: http://www.coydog.us/ - Only genuine coydog breeders I know.

~Seij
Posted by Seijun  on  Sun Oct 23, 2005  at  12:29 PM
Michael,

I don't know where you can find that mix but I know where you can find a coy/sibe mix and they have many right now of all ages. Sundance Ranch in Oregon. Their dogs have wonderful temperaments.
I will definitely have one of theirs one day.
Mick
Posted by MICK  in  OKLAHOMA  on  Fri Oct 28, 2005  at  11:35 AM
It is foolish to say that coydogs are an urban legend. There are many wild dogs that have crossed with cyotes in the wild in the CA mountains. I have a true coydog and my vet was the one to tell me about her. She started growing a second fuzzy tan/grey coat over her pitch black coat at 2 years old. She shows her cyote ways in her submisivness and spazness quite often. It offends my beloved dog to say she does not exsist. I am proud of her and what she is.
Posted by Tiffany  in  San Marino, CA  on  Thu Dec 15, 2005  at  09:50 PM
There's a great story in Of Wolves and Men about a scientist studying wolves who manages an interview with an old Eskimo. Anxious to impress the old guy, the scientists reels off his knowledge of wolves and at some points asks, "Do you find this to be true of wolves?" The old man replied, "Which wolf?" Many of the posting I've read refer to the behavior of hybreds as if it were a concrete and predictable thing. When we consider the great variety of behaviors among humans can we honestly say, "This and oly this is how humans behave." Certainly, we cannot. For example, I have trained many German Shepherds. As anyone who has trained animals will tell you, the personality of each animal is unique. Now a Lab is a lot more likely to chase a stick than a Huskie, but within these genetic tendancies there lies a universe of individual differences. And this is so with hybreds. I owned a high content wold hybred and certainly she was a hunter. She preferred a hole to a dog house and believed that if she froze when I caught her stealing a thawing fish of the counter that I would not be able to see her in the brush of our tile kitchen. But she was an individual. I will agree that people who know nothing of hybreds should not own them. However, there are millions of dog owners who should not have dogs. I have tried to train the pets of people who shouldn't be allowed to have house plants. We cannot prevent the ownership of animals by such people. There are no books or classes at the local junior college that will make you a good owner for a poodle, a pit bull or a hybred. You are a good owner when you can observe, care for and communicate with animals. There are animal people the way there are people people. It takes care, understanding and the willingness to interact with the animal. As the human in the relationship, of course, you must take the lead. And so it is with the owning of hybreds. There are no fast rules or formulas. It does take common sense. A hybred, for example, is likely to eat the cat he's chasing and male hybreds are quite often unable to curb the instinct to mark your couch. But the key to safely owning one- just as it is the key to safely owning a Rott- is that you are an intelligent, caring, adaptable human being. If you bring that to the table, you can do it. Myself, I don't think I'd do very well with Poodles.
Posted by David Wagstaff  in  Portland Oregon  on  Fri Dec 30, 2005  at  04:55 PM
Hi David,
I respect your opinion BUT
I think you misunderstand all of this. We are not saying don't own one. We are saying beware because you don't know what you will get with these dogs. Too many end up in rescue and too many are put down. I personally have two of them. I am a very caring owner and have had dogs for over 30 years. But I wasn't prepared for an aggressive dog, one that bites the other and generally makes life miserable for the other dog. And I am not the only one. I know at the very lest ten people who have these dogs and most of them have issues from chasing cars to biting their owners. I agree you need to have a strong alpha personality to have an aggresive dog, especially a large one but it isn't easy. And it is not always safe. I am thankful to still have mine since he bit someone and they didn't report it. But it has taken a lot of work and a lot of training to get through this. Still, life is very strained because you have to be on guard every minute. And the problem with these dogs is that you are more likely to get an aggressive one than you would with a lab or golden or poodle for that matter. I am not saying those dogs can't be trouble because I personnally know of a small child whose face was ripped wide open by a poodle. I think they are nasty little dogs yet I wouldn't tell someone not to buy one. We are just saying the percentage of AID's and Naid's that turn out to be aggressive is very high. And you need to be fully aware of what you are getting into before you take on the challenge. Respectfully, Mick
Posted by mick  in  tulsa  on  Fri Dec 30, 2005  at  06:27 PM
Actually, I've never known a pittbull to attack a human with any intention other than covering him with slobber, which they have in plenty. They're one of the friendlier breeds. Strangely, their playful nature has played a role in earning them their bad reputation. They tend to frequently engage in agonistic play with other dogs, but this isn't at all the same as viciousness or mean-spiritedness. To my knowledge, their worst quality is that they're complete clowns and don't know their own strength. And it really hurts when they step on your toes.

Chow chows, however, are a nightmare. They're mean, and they do it on purpose.

None of this is to be taken as a rule. Dogs differ in personality as much as people. Different breeds do have different tendencies, though, and one should be aware of them.
Posted by Bill Mutz  in  NC  on  Tue Jan 10, 2006  at  06:22 PM
hiya. i was told my 9 pond dog is part coyote, and i must say i doubt it.
so i showed up here and elsewhere to check it all out.
good reading! thanks all!
however, i remain equally unconvinced that coydogs are a nonesuch due to the differing estrus periods [mating seasons] for the different species.
i say this scheduling difference implies an _incentive_ for the creation of coydogs.
what are coyotes gonna do all those months when their ladyfriends arent in the mood and worse smell wrong?
just a thought.
imput from people who know something much appreciated.
jay sheckley and her weird lil dog romeo
Posted by jay sheckley  in  berkeley ca  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  02:04 AM
Coydogs do exist and as a matter of fact, I have one. But you can find out all you want to know if you visit the website of Sundance Ranch in Oregon. They breed a coy/sibe mix and you are correct, they breed once per year. Her dogs are lovely and they are real.
http://www.coydog.us
Posted by MICK  in  TULSA  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  11:53 AM
BTW, coydogs weigh about 45-55 pounds in most cases. Mine weighs 72, so it depends on what else they are mixed with.
Posted by MICK  in  TULSA  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  11:55 AM
"what are coyotes gonna do all those months when their ladyfriends arent in the mood and worse smell wrong?"

Go about living I suppose. Remember, the males can only breed once a year too.

~Seij
Posted by Seijun  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  02:34 PM
fair enough, Seij! Since yesterday I've looked at more more pix and I'm jollywell convinced despite opinions to the contrary that my 14 month old pet furbaby is in fact ::gasp!:: a genuine dog!
love jay and romeo
Posted by jay sheckley  in  berkeley ca  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  03:05 PM
Actually, unless I recall incorrectly, a domestic male can breed at any time of year. I don't imagine a coydog would be likely to end up as someone's pet unless picked up as a "stray" and taken to be a nondescript mutt...which...wouldn't be entirely inaccurate.
Posted by Bill Mutz  in  NC  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  04:21 PM
mr mutz writes< I don't imagine a coydog would be likely to end up as someone's pet unless picked up as a "stray" and taken to be a nondescript mutt...which...wouldn't be entirely inaccurate.>>

my guy _did_ come from the shelter, was a stray found stumbling around rather well with one broken foot. nobody knew where he came from, which is likely common enough. he's said to be part chihuahua, which in coyote is pronounced "snack", no? the shelter refuses to speculate what else.

i was stopped in the street and told he's surely part coyote- but probly less than half.howzabout none?

the guy said a coydog probly mated with a chihuahua.

romeo _is_ pretty strange-looking. exotic. when i first saw him even though i wanted a dog so much i wasnt sure i wanted him. everyone else says he's cute but at first i felt put off in an odd way. i didnt take to his look at all. then they put him in my arms, and boy he liked it there! hate to say this but he sorta hypnotised me. :D the broken foot was the clincher.

romeo looks a LOT like a fox, he really has a somewhat coydog look pelt i admit. he hasnt got that cold expression. does that matter?

he may well be a Pomchi. his toes look normal to me but i havent accessed the online toe data yet. he is fast, with a bizarre gait. his forepaws happen to be 2-3 dogshoe sizes bigger than his back feet. he's either completely mellow or crazed, often somewhat devious. he burrows and hides things. he's _quiet_. the trainer says he's a "thinky" dog and therefore a good match for me.... hmmm...

ive looked at pictures and read all this. i really appreciate your input, rather feel we are undeserving of your expert attention.

yet continually people say, what IS that?

i really dont know what he is but i am hooked on him.
romeo doesnt care what you call him unless it's late for dinner.

he resembles a pygmy fox. [?]
he could be a dog!

thanks again,
jay and her weird lil animal romeo
Posted by jay sheckley  in  berkeley ca  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  11:38 PM
i just looked at the coydogs mick sent me to. yes my guy romeo does have the face and body shape though not the husky size.

though very brown-eyed, he _does_ look like that, the snout the stance the smile even. thankyou!
this is fun.
jay, his coy mistress

-----

mr mutz writes< I don't imagine a coydog would be likely to end up as someone's pet unless picked up as a "stray" and taken to be a nondescript mutt...which...wouldn't be entirely inaccurate.>>

my guy _did_ come from the shelter, was a stray found stumbling around rather well with one broken foot. nobody knew where he came from, which is likely common enough. he's said to be part chihuahua, which in coyote is pronounced "snack", no? the shelter refuses to speculate what else.

i was stopped in the street and told he's surely part coyote- but probly less than half.howzabout none?

the guy said a coydog probly mated with a chihuahua.

romeo _is_ pretty strange-looking. exotic. when i first saw him even though i wanted a dog so much i wasnt sure i wanted him. everyone else says he's cute but at first i felt put off in an odd way. i didnt take to his look at all. then they put him in my arms, and boy he liked it there! hate to say this but he sorta hypnotised me. :D the broken foot was the clincher.

romeo looks a LOT like a fox, he really has a somewhat coydog look pelt i admit. he hasnt got that cold expression. does that matter?

he may well be a Pomchi. his toes look normal to me but i havent accessed the online toe data yet. he is fast, with a bizarre gait. his forepaws happen to be 2-3 dogshoe sizes bigger than his back feet. he's either completely mellow or crazed, often somewhat devious. he burrows and hides things. he's _quiet_. the trainer says he's a "thinky" dog and therefore a good match for me.... hmmm...

ive looked at pictures and read all this. i really appreciate your input, rather feel we are undeserving of your expert attention.

yet continually people say, what IS that?

i really dont know what he is but i am hooked on him.
romeo doesnt care what you call him unless it's late for dinner.

he resembles a pygmy fox. [?]
he could be a dog!

thanks again,
jay and her weird lil animal romeo
Posted by jay sheckley  in  berkeley ca  on  Wed Jan 18, 2006  at  11:46 PM
"Actually, unless I recall incorrectly, a domestic male can breed at any time of year"

Yes, that is correct. A domestic dog can breed any time of year, but both male and females of wild candids only breed once a year.

~Seij
Posted by seijun  on  Thu Jan 19, 2006  at  11:43 AM
I JUST learned about this coydog bread and was doing a little online research and came across this site. I got my dog, Chilly, about a year ago from a shelter. They said he was just picked up as a stray dog when he was a puppy and they guessed his mix as huskie/border collie. He looks IDENTICAL to a fox and is about the same size, except he has black and white fur. A person was over at our house during a party the other night(I'm an OSU college student) and she asked me if he was a Coydog. I had no idea what a coydog was, but she told me her friend had one that looked exactly like my little buddy Chilly. She also mentioned something about the way he walks, which is more of a trot, as a characteristic of a Coydog. I looked at pictures online and saw one that looks EXACTLY like my dog and claims it as a Coydog
Is there anyway of knowing if my dog is actually a Coydog. Who ever has one let me know if these would be characteristics along the line of a Coydog: looks exactly like a fox, large pointed ears, tail looks like those of the sundance huskies, larger and sharper teeth than dogs his size, unbelievably agile, can easily clear my futon when he jumps which is annoying when I try to catch him, trots or somewhat skips when he walks, very friendly or very submissive around some people though he loves biting my hand and our other dog, he is VERY attached to me. Also when I first got him he couldn't bark until about 7 months he always made more of a howling/whining noise and still does so when he wants something and especially when he sights other animals, mostly dogs. If anyone wants to give me their opinion or tell me how I could find out if he is a Coydog that'd be great, this coydog thing is pretty interesting.
Posted by Mark  in  Columbus, OH  on  Tue Feb 07, 2006  at  03:25 PM
Also I have no idea if this would mean anything but he has brown eyes, except on the very top there is a section of iris on either eye that is white with a little blue on the iris, I guess like a Huskie. It looks like he has two white spots right above his pupils.
Posted by Mark  on  Tue Feb 07, 2006  at  03:34 PM
Maybe send in a good photo to the breeder at
Sundance Ranch. She most probably would know..
But sometimes it's hard to tell in a photo.
Wouldn't hurt to ask.
Posted by annie  on  Tue Feb 07, 2006  at  04:07 PM
You will have to post pics. The characteristics you describe could all be found in the various breeds of domestic dog. Though, it sounds as though your pup could very well be part berder collie as the shelter claims. They can look very much like a coyote or fox. Also, collies tend to trot and walk more like a wolf or coyote.

~Seij
Posted by seijun  on  Tue Feb 07, 2006  at  09:57 PM
Do you have a picture of your dog Chilly that you could email me? I can get you a better opinion if I see the dog. I know the owner of Sundance and she would surely know. I also have a coydog. They do walk a little differently but they tend to sway against you as they walk. Or if he is with my other dog he sways toward her. They seem to walk sideways because they are always brushing up against you. They tend to hide from strangers. They are usually shy.

There is one distinct characteristic that will tell you if have a coydog. Please write to me directly and email me a picture if you can. I have never heard it described in any of these websites.

My address is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Posted by mick  in  tulsa  on  Thu Feb 09, 2006  at  03:52 AM
To the UO student whose dog, Chilly, behaves and looks like a Coydog.

As far as I know there is no genetic test to determine whether your animal is a hybred. You could, however, contact a vet to see if such a test exists. But as someone who has owned hybreds and been around Coydogs, I'd say the behaviors indicate wome sort of mix. My wolf hybred, for example, didn't learn to bark until I got a dog who exhibited this very unwolf behavior. The yipping and yowling is very Coyote-like as well. On the other hand, Coyotes are not casual breeders so if Chilly is a hybred the chances are the breeding was engineered by a humans. Dogs that breed with Coyotes on their own tend to be wild and stay wild. At any rate, it sounds like you have a great animal.
Posted by David Wagstaff  in  Portland, OR  on  Thu Feb 09, 2006  at  10:42 AM
I used to raise Dobermans.. we had litters of pups any month of the year.. for her to say dogs only whelp in the winter tells me she is full of crap. And if she can be that far off.. I seriously doubt her opinion on coydogs.
Posted by donna  on  Sun Mar 12, 2006  at  02:24 PM
Donna. I don't recal anyone saying dogs whelp only once a year. COYOTES only welp once a year (as do all other wild candids that I know of) but DOMESTIC DOGS can whelp 1-2 times a year depending on the breed.

~Seij
Posted by seijun  on  Sun Mar 12, 2006  at  10:15 PM
*test*
Posted by seijun  on  Thu Mar 30, 2006  at  12:57 PM
I'm almost 100% sure my dog, Hoodoo, is a Coydog. I got her in Arizona (mother an Australian Sheperd, father unknown). She does have the look and markings, and her feet definitely say coyote. At 38 pounds she'a about the right size for one. Very intense amber eyes. Barking is more a "second language" to her, but she's done the yipping and "talking" since she was a pup. Timid around strangers. Very skittish, quick to bolt, but extremely loyal to me -- if she's waiting outside and I'm in a store, she won't take her eyes off me, and potential girlfriends (mine) have to meet her approval first. I've had her for 11 years now, and she's quite spoiled. I'd say she's much harder to handle and raise than your average pooch, but she's a great dog.
Posted by EricP  in  Charleston, SC  on  Thu Apr 27, 2006  at  12:54 PM
We have 6 coypups. Their mother is pure coyoty, and their father is catahoula cur dog. we have pictures of the mother nursing the pups. We have 2 we are willing to sell. To see a picture click the link below.
http://www.usfreeads.com/513627-cls.html

Or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for more pictures!
Posted by David Ledford  in  Greenville, SC  on  Fri Jun 02, 2006  at  05:17 PM
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