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The Nazi Air Marker Hoax, 1942
Burger King's Left-Handed Whopper Hoax, 1998
Bizarre pictographs of Emmanuel Domenech, 1860
Cursed by Allah
The Lovely Feejee Mermaid, 1842
The Nobody For President Campaign, 1940 to Present
Prankster causes volcano to erupt, 1974
Tourist Guy 9/11 Hoax, Sep 2001
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Adolf Hitler Baby Photo Hoax, 1933
Boycott Gillette
image I've received quite a few emails with questions like this: Is Gillette really putting spy chips inside of their products that allow them to spy on consumers at a distance? Is the company surreptitiously snapping photographs of people who pick up their products from store shelves? Are these and other claims being made at the Boycott Gillette website really true? Well, the strange thing is, as wild as these claims sound, they're actually true. Or rather, they used to be true... and could be true again in the future. Gillette did experiment with putting 'spy chips' (wireless transmitting devices, also known as RFID tags, or Radio Frequency Identification Tags) inside of the packaging of its products. And it did experiment with photographing people who picked up its products in stores. This was all revealed last year (read about it in this Guardian article). Gillette claims that it's not currently continuing these experiments, but it's still an enthusiastic supporter of the concept of the use of RFID tags, believing that they could help prevent theft and help the company better manage its inventory. They dismiss claims that the chips would be used to spy on people outside of the store. Dick Cantwell, Vice-president of global business management for Gillette, has been quoted in the media as saying that Gillette would probably only consider putting RFID tags in all its products once the price of the tags came down to around one cent each. Maybe in ten years or so. Another organization (besides Boycott Gillette) that's worried about the privacy concerns that the use of RFID tags raises is Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering. Personally, I've been boycotting Gillette for years for a different reason. Their razor blades are too expensive. Plus, I don't see a need to have double, triple, or quadruple-bladed razors (or whatever number they're now up too). A cheap single-bladed, generic razor works fine for me.
Categories: Conspiracy Theories, Technology
Posted by The Curator on Sat May 22, 2004
Comments (3)
This is pretty ironic, considering that Gillette was founded by King Gillette, who was famous for his idealistic, utopian and quite progessive ideals. And now the company's taken a turn toward the Orwellian extension of these ideals!
Posted by Josh  in  CA  on  Sun May 23, 2004  at  06:27 PM
Gillette' Oral B a HOAX? I recently purchased an
Oral-B Tooth Brush with a rebate offer of $ 10.00
The requirements were UPC Code and Register Receipt. The register receipt I Removed from the bottom my Debit Card Info, the remaining receipt reflected all the Items that I had purchased along with Subtotal, Sales Tax, and Total. The Company stated that "did not meet the cash register receipt requirements" and refused my rebate. I think this is a poor excuse for not paying the rebate.
Posted by Rachel Rutherford  on  Tue Apr 19, 2005  at  07:17 AM
Love your shaving gel and detest the huge,leaky can it comes in.As a frequent traveller and shaving twice a day at times,this ugly thing will not fit into the average shaving kit so it has to ride loose in my briefcase or carry-on.Think of the travelling man;why not half size,even if it costs a little mor???
We don't need a bucket every trip!
Posted by Otto Kniepkamp  in  canada  on  Sat Feb 25, 2006  at  08:21 PM
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