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BIOPRO EMF Harmonization Chips
Cranky Media Guy sent me a link to this interesting product: BIOPRO Chips. BIOPRO describes itself as a leader in the field of EMF harmonization devices. You see, you may not have realized it but, as BIOPRO tells you on their website, virtually all electronic devices emit dangerous electromagnetic frequency (EMF). Phones, microwaves, computers... You name it. So what's a person to do? Simple. Get some BIOPRO Chips. These amazing chips are designed to defend against EMF. Apply some of them to your electronic devices, and EMF emissions will be 'harmonized', thereby rendered harmless. It took me a while before I figured out exactly what these 'chips' were. But then I figured it out. 'Chips' is a euphemism for 'stickers'. BIOPRO is selling little stickers that are supposed to protect people against 'electro-pollution'. Of course, the website contains no explanation of how or why these stickers would work. Obviously that's because these stickers won't do anything but lighten your wallet by a substantial amount.
Categories: Technology
Posted by The Curator on Wed Apr 13, 2005
This is nothing more than a take-off on the term EMP - Electromagnetic Pulse - that is a very real threat associated with upper atmospheric thermonuclear bursts. EMP can virtually freeze all communications in the effected area, by a combination of reversing magnetic polarization, and over-amping power input to all electronic tranmitting devices. Go fry your electronic brains, why don't you? Even automobiles with electronic ignition cannot be started after a full burst of EMP. But that's beside the point - it doesn't happen without a large nuclear weapon detonation. I'd be more concerned about the heat and blast, let alone the radiation, if I survived the former. This EMF is a bunch of crap!
Posted by stork  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  12:33 AM
Hmm, I was under the impression that EMP technology was being developed that didn't involve harmful radiation or explosions. Sounds like a pretty neat weapon, although granted it would kill anyone with a pacemaker.
Speaking of computer chips in everything, isn't the army considering getting a new standard gun that has a computer guidance-system of some sort? Not that EMP would disable the gun, but perhaps soldiers expecting their granades to blow up after a certain time would get a bad surprise.
Posted by Citizen Premier  in  spite of public outcry  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  01:39 AM
If there's ever a strong enough solar flare, you can kiss radio, television and probably your phone good bye for the duration. No amount of stupid little stickers is going to protect you.

I just LOVE the "scientific" gibberish on sites like this one. It's not like I was any kind of Science Fair geek but sheesh! Don't people have even the most basic grasp of what's credible in terms of science??

And what's with the indiscriminate use of the word "vibrations" on every quack site?
Posted by Cranky Media Guy  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  03:24 AM
Nuclear explosions are not the only cause of Electromagnetic Pulses. We aren't sure what all can make one, but you can be sure that unusual sun activity (such as the previously mentioned solar flare) can do it.

Radiation isn't a necessity in the equation. All you need is a release of electromagnetic energy large and powerful enough to produce power surges and polarity reversal. I wouldn't be surprised if certain forms of lightning could do it.

Anyway, cool stickers.
Posted by Barghest  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  04:53 AM
EMF is used improperly there, lets just say EM radiation.

An EMP is just a short intense burst of EM radiation and/or a strong magnetic field. EMP =/= EM. An EMP from a nuclear weapon has very little affect on biological lifeforms, but does damage almost anythign electrical. However, if a nuclear weapon goes off near you, you probably have other worries. Any such EM 'burst' with similar effects can have that name, and I have heard too that they are developing such weapons for law enforcement. Better than guns I suppose.

EM radiation is "a combination of oscillating electric and magnetic fields perpendicular to each other, moving through space as a wave" (through some unknown-as-yet medium). It is inclusive of ELF waves, radio, microwave, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, x-rays and gamma rays. It travels at the speed of light (because it is light). You can't avoid it. Pretty much every object in the universe gives off heat in the form of radiation. Don't confuse "radiation" with "radioactive". Only radiation between gamma and far UV is ionizing (the bad kind), meaning it has enough energy and small enough waves to knock electrons off their atoms. Any radiation is not good for you in high doses, but you might as well try avoiding any heat or light source at all.

Worth stating again: light is EM.

A magnetic field could kill you, but we've never even come close on earth to making one that strong, not even with a nuclear bomb. An MRI machine can grab a steel compressed air cylinder from across a room, but it can't even touch the iron in your blood (which is a non-magnetic molecule, iron electrons have to be free to flow). Your bodily fluids are actually slightly repelled.

So I wouldn't put too much faith in a sticker being able to block either, at all.
Posted by Splarka  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  05:41 AM
Holy sh**! I was exposed to EMF this morning! It made me hear voices! What to do? Well, what could I do? I turned the radio off, and the voices stopped.
Posted by Nigel  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  07:24 AM
I was exposed to EMF as a child; although I was in two minds as to whether they were better than Jesus Jones or not. Listened to nowadays, 'Unbelievable' is clearly the superior song, and 'Schubert Dip' is an entertaining insight into the early 90s pop/rave scene, although the Shamen's 'Boss Drum' is probably a better introduction to those heady days. Ah, the early 1990s. Before most of you were born, I'd warrant. Back then long time ago when fractals were cool - woke up in a daze, arrived like strangers in the night etc
Posted by Ashley Pomeroy  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  07:27 AM
Just another attempt to sell a product based on language that people hear is "bad". People really should do a bit of their own research instead of sending out about $450 for a pack of stickers that do nothing...
Posted by Just a random guy  in  in a hospital, out of a long coma  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  09:16 AM
I think you're being a little harsh there, Alex. I'm sure those stickers do SOMETHING to the electromagnetic field in their immediate vicinity (almost everything does). Of course, this tiny effect will be of absoluetly no consequence, to your health or otherwise, but hey, what to you expect from a sticker?
Posted by Big Gary C  in  Dallas, Texas  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  01:56 PM
That site was filled with so much BS it amazes. How anyone's greed could be so great to stoop so low. This site should come under lawsuit before long. On one page it even said their product was shown to cause no difference? I might not agree with most common street criminals, but thiefs hiding behind website rip offs should be shot.
Posted by sbnature  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  04:56 PM
I notice that for only $269 you can buy a pendant to wear for protection from ... well, from whatever it's supposed to protect you from. It would be a lot cheaper to just buy one of those T-shirts that says, "I'm with Stupid," with an arrow that points up toward your own head.

However, it's no dumber (although more expensive) than believing that wearing a quartz crystal can make you healthier, a nostrum that several otherwise intelligent people of my aquaintance have fallen for.
Posted by Big Gary C  in  Dallas, Texas  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  07:58 PM
I'm surprised you didn't pick up that this plays off the whole "harmonic water crystals" shown on "What The !@#$@% Do We Know". They actually reference Emoto's photos as evidence of the "harmonic" effect. And since we are 70% water, I've stopped singing in the shower for fear of it retaliating.
Posted by Dave H  in  Santa Monica  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  08:12 PM
Dave, you can sing in the shower as much as you want - just don't bother the neighbors. sbnature, Absolutely - Take them out to be shot!
Big Gary c, Of course - everything affects everything else. I think Newton proved that, but most reactions on this small planet are minute, compared with universal cause and effect.
Splarka, you sound like you know what you're talking about.
Citizen Premier, Yes, I also read about experiments in EMP weapons technology not involving nuclear weapons. Don't know how far they've gotten. And yes, recently, the Army IS experimenting with a rifle that has a side-mounted video display, with the intention that a soldier can point it around a building's corner, acquire a target, shoot and hit it (the enemy), without exposing anything more than the soldier's hands, and maybe one forearm. And, finally, Ashley - I *love* your sense of humor!
Posted by stork  on  Thu Apr 14, 2005  at  11:12 PM
Electromagnetic radiation CAN be rather bad for your health, and I have seen a poorly-shielded microwave oven boil a glass of wine that was sitting several feet beside it (I left the area rather quickly upon making that observation). I don't think that any little sticker would be able to deal with that sort of thing.
Cell-phones and computers and whatnot do give off EM radiation, but not that sort of high-energy radiation. Is the radiation from them harmful to us? Perhaps, but if so, only on the level of it killing the occasional cell in your body -- not enough of a problem to have any harmful effect. Computer circuits are more sensitive to EM than people are, so if they gave off enough energy to be able to fry a person, they'd first fry themselves. I haven't seen many examples of cell-phones committing suicide. The radiation we get from the sun probably gives us a larger dose of radiation than our various electronic gizmos, and over a wider spectrum of wavelengths. So if we're going to start worrying about the chronic effects of having your computer turned on, then we'd first start burrowing into the earth to escape the sun (and even down there, the cosmic rays and neutrinos will still get us).
So in the case of something like the microwave, the stickers aren't going to do any good, while with other electronics, they're not worth the worry.
I am curious about one thing, though: how does BIOPRO plan to deal with the "harmful radiation" given off by pacemakers inside of people? Now in a store near you: BIOPRO suppositories!
Posted by Accipiter  on  Fri Apr 15, 2005  at  01:12 AM
Oh, and in answer to Citizen Premier's question about computerized guns: the last I heard the U.S. Army is planning on issuing these weird new assault rifles in the not-to-distant future. They're a combination rifle/grenade launcher, which can be taken apart into both a separate rifle and a separate grenade launcher. Maybe not a bad idea, by itself. However, they also have all sorts of computerized menus and stuff were you program the gun to fire a grenade 57.3 meters, or to fire three shots at a time, or whatever. All of which will be real fun to use in combat ("Oops, time out, guys! I need to sit here and re-program my gun so I can kill you!), and which also means that in order to service your weapon you'll need to have college degrees in Computer Programming and Electrical Engineering. As for what happens when the battery dies, who knows? Sit and wait for the system to re-boot? The U.S. military always was a bit too technology-happy; the more buttons and switches and flashing lights something has, the more they like it. Personally, I found the old M-16 to be bad enough, and it didn't even have any built-in electrical components.
There are also new computerized systems for guns that read the user's fingerprints, and if the user's prints don't match the prints recorded in the chip's memory, the gun can't be fired. Law enforcement people are really interested in this idea, because it would keep people from stealing and using their guns.
Posted by Accipiter  on  Fri Apr 15, 2005  at  01:16 AM
That's the 'OICW', or 'Objective Infantry Combat Weapon', which seems to have died a death. However, there was mention on this very site some time ago of an EMP gun; the man who produced it had someone won a certain amount of funding from the Navy, although his website was extremely unconvincing and it reeked of hoaxes.
(goes through memory)
Ah, I believe it was 'XtremeADS', or something. Stood for 'extreme alternative defence systems', although it was obviously one of those generic URLs registered in the hopes of selling it on (to a company dealing in 'extreme adverts', perhaps). They seem to have redone their web site, and issued some mocked-up pictures of their 'stunstrike', but it still seems very fishy.
Posted by Ashley Pomeroy  on  Fri Apr 15, 2005  at  09:31 AM
The Pentagon is investigating a "less lethal" weapon to use on rioters and such, people they don't want to kill.

It shoots a beam of microwaves that can't penetrate the skin deeply (thus doing no internal damage) but do cause what's apparently incredibly intense pain. I doubt a sticker would be very effective.
Posted by Carl Fink  on  Fri Apr 15, 2005  at  11:20 PM
The device you call "sticker" is actually a resin which is infused with a resonant frequnecy which harmonizes the negative effects of EMF on our bodies. It is impossible to completly block the negative frequency your cell emits without killing your signal, thus, the "sticker" uses it's own frequency to protect our bodies from the EMF emmited from phones. Granted, it seems like another way for some fool to make some cash. However, i have recieved numerous phone calls from many clients who tell me their headaches are gone, their ear no longer gets hot, and they feel better on days they constantly use their phone.
Say what you want, believe what you want, but the science is real and so are the dangers of EMF. The litte pendant you speak of is a prodcut made by Clarus designed to harmonize your own BioField and assist your body with the stresses EMF's and other enviormental conditions. You say its a crock, and if that is so, why are 300 Tour Golf players wearing a Qlink. WHY DID TIGER WOODS ASK FOR TWO? DONT BELIEVE ME, CHECK GOLFDIGEST.COM AND SEARCH FOR YOURSELF.
Good luck...im out!!!
Posted by Joseph  in  haha...ignorance is bliss!!!  on  Mon Apr 25, 2005  at  01:36 AM
Joseph said:

Posted by Cranky Media Guy  on  Wed Apr 27, 2005  at  02:52 AM
Interesting reply to my email.

I cannot speak physics with you as i am a business major, but i will say this, personal testimonials sell a product better than any other marketing i have seen. now, before you jump to your cranky conclusion, let me elaborate with this: i mean word of mouth testimonials. when people start talking about a product or service they believe in, its easy to sell a product. my reference to phone calls from clients was not a "selling point", but rather a "maybe the technology really does work and people are actually feeling a difference point." see the difference? i ran across this forum and i thought id drop a line based on my experience of the products, not argue who is right or the physics of technology that i doubt you could actually keep up with. (sorry for the assumption, no foul intended).

when i muscle test people for other products that claim they do the same ours does, there is absolutly no difference in their strength. however, with our products, people feel how it works through kinesiology.

check out clarus.com for info and research on the Qlink, and yes, we do sell the Qlink. i never said tiger endorsed out product, however i think its interesting that he has asked for two of them. You make a good arguement as to tiger wearing the product for the look, but have you seen our products? they dont look that appealing! nevertheless, loosen up a little bit and if you want to become a distibutor let me know. I am confident i have sold you on the products and the business, i look forward to hearing from you!
Posted by Joseph  on  Thu Apr 28, 2005  at  04:26 AM
Joseph said:

Joseph said:

"Interesting reply to my email.

"I cannot speak physics with you as i am a business major, but i will say this, personal testimonials sell a product better than any other marketing i have seen. now, before you jump to your cranky conclusion, let me elaborate with this: i mean word of mouth testimonials. when people start talking about a product or service they believe in, its easy to sell a product. my reference to phone calls from clients was not a "selling point", but rather a "maybe the technology really does work and people are actually feeling a difference point." see the difference?"

I have no doubt that testimonials help sell product, but what does that have to do with whether or not the product WORKS? The way to determine that--the only accurate way--is by proper scientific testing. Either it works or it doesn't.

"i ran across this forum and i thought id drop a line based on my experience of the products, not argue who is right or the physics of technology that i doubt you could actually keep up with. (sorry for the assumption, no foul intended)."

Yes, that's right, I'm SO STUPID that I couldn't POSSIBLY understand your bogus "scientific" mumbo-jumbo. Duh. Hey, wait! I thought you were a business major and not capable of speaking physics. Are you a sales-weasel or a genius in undiscovered-by-the-scientific-mainstream physics?

"when i muscle test people for other products that claim they do the same ours does, there is absolutly no difference in their strength. however, with our products, people feel how it works through kinesiology."

Are you referring to that bullshit where the thing being "tested" is placed in the person's hand and if they don't resist your pushing on their arm to your satisfaction, that somehow "proves" something or other? THAT'S the "science" that Stupid Ol' Me couldn't possibly understand? Um, I know enough to know that that is discredited horseshit.

"check out clarus.com for info and research on the Qlink, and yes, we do sell the Qlink."

And as I tried to get you to explain before, how does the QLink relate to the BIOPRO Chips? They're two different products, right, so how does talking about one of them tell me anything about the other?

"i never said tiger endorsed out product, however i think its interesting that he has asked for two of them."

I hear he asked for two shoes in a department store, too. I guess that proves that shoes "harmonize EMF." What ELSE could it possibly mean?

continued...
Posted by Cranky Media Guy  on  Thu Apr 28, 2005  at  05:57 AM
...continued

"You make a good arguement as to tiger wearing the product for the look, but have you seen our products? they dont look that appealing!"

I'll take your word about the unattractiveness of your products. As for Tiger Woods liking the way they look, I was merely proposing that as one possible reason why he might have wanted to own them, assuming that he actually does, that is. Not that a SALESPERSON would EVER lie about something that might help sell his product.

"nevertheless, loosen up a little bit and if you want to become a distibutor let me know. I am confident i have sold you on the products and the business, i look forward to hearing from you!"

You can look forward to it all you want, but it ain't gonna happen, Bub! Life's too short to waste any of it on selling crap to the gullible.

As for your confidence that you have sold me on the products, I only wish I could attach a sound file to this message--although Dumb Ol' Me would have to bring in a technician to handle a technical job like that--so you could hear me laughing at that ridiculous notion. I trust I have made my position on this clear.
Posted by Cranky Media Guy  on  Thu Apr 28, 2005  at  05:59 AM
your inability to leave your own insecurities out of a discussion and stay on point has become more frustrating than i can take.

i never referred to you as stupid. i even put a disclaimer in my post incase my asssumption was wrong. why would you write..."
Yes, that's right, I'm SO STUPID that I couldn't POSSIBLY understand your bogus "scientific" mumbo-jumbo. Duh."?

is your reading comprehension really that bad, or are you so insecure in regards to your own
knowledge and education that you really did think i meant you were stupid?

"I have no doubt that testimonials help sell product, but what does that have to do with whether or not the product WORKS? The way to determine that--the only accurate way--is by proper scientific testing. Either it works or it doesn't." through kinesiology people can feel a difference immediatley, over time they feel a difference in their body, thus the product sells. more research should become available in coming weeks, i will link that onto here.

for now, relazx and study the website so when i sign you up to distribute the product you know what to say....thanks....joseph

Qlink and biopro use the same technology, that is why i refernce to Qlink. point taken on tiger woods, i guess golfdigest.com is inaccurate when they talk about golfers and products they use. please forgive my ignorance.
Posted by joseph  on  Thu Apr 28, 2005  at  04:40 PM
You really do make me laugh, Joseph. The bottom line here is that you peddle crap by spewing pseudo-scientific nonsense. You can indulge in all the personal attacks you want but nothing will change those basic facts. Y

I notice that you don't even attempt to respond to the questions I asked you. Why, it's almost as if you KNOW that the crap you sell doesn't work (other than the placebo effect of course) and you CAN'T give reasonable answers.

Tell you what. If you sincerely believe in those stupid "resins" or whatever they are, why don't you show the world how scientifically effective they are by applying for the James Randi Educational Foundation's prize? Go to randi.org for the details. There's a million dollars waiting for you if you can prove they work under controlled conditions. You wouldn't even have to explain HOW they work; you'd just have to PROVE THAT THEY DO. Since you're so sure they work, this should be easy money for you.

Why do you keep making yourself look foolish by insisting that I'm going to become a distributor for your crap? Hell will get a hockey franchise before that happens. I don't even want to sell legitimate products, let along phony nonsense marketed to the gullible.
Posted by Cranky Media Guy  on  Fri Apr 29, 2005  at  04:56 AM
The QLinks and the Harmonization Chips are bogus. On any http://www.mybiopro.com/dealerhere website you will see a research section. . . Now if any of you have taken calculous (I took Calc I & II in college) you will see probability derivatives in this research. Well to make a long story short these products do not care about actual EMF. These products only care about radiating heat.

These people believe that since we are made up of water than the overheating will have negative effects on us.

Another thing that just makes me laugh is the attack on computers. I am a computer technician and I can tell you that if your CPU Box is not shielding EMF, then I want to know how your computer is even working. Computers have to be shielded in order for them to work properly.

I think this companies hoax is to do a network marketing scheme to gather people up so they can make "the long dollar" on this product. Look into their "Business Opportunity" on those websites.

I have no remorse for the stupid people of this planet. If they honestly believe a little chip or a copper/gold pendant is really going to protect them from EMF, let them. These things use a SRT (Sound Resonating Tunnel) to harmonize EMF. Well guess what I did take a lot of physics throughout highschool and college and can tell you that if you can make a sound wave harmonize an EMF wave, you better go and talk to NASA because they are sure going to be needing your input for a thing called a sub-light engine.

I am not totally against looking into things, but when offered the research and this is what I find, well then I can say "NO". The research is non-conclusive as to the adverse effects of EMF on people. The Swedes are conducting a 10 year test of cell phones and cancer. Midway report says. . . oh oh oh. . . Non-conclusive as thus far. Science did not say that they don't just said halfway through they are not sure yet. I like that people who are guessing and testing rather than just throwing out a bunch of radical technical terms that could not even possibly exists at this point in human technology.

I just must say they are doing a good job, because of I have been approached by some of their lackies in my area to buy this. I said well let me look into and then I will get back to you. I looked into it, called the individual back and said nice try.
Posted by phenger  on  Tue Jul 19, 2005  at  11:15 AM
Oh and another thing:

I don't want to hear about testimonials used to sell the product or other media babble. What does "Golf Digest" know about physics. . . Hmmmm not a thing! Tiger Woods is an athlete, well come on let's let club-swinging Stephen Hawking speak on this product. Tiger Woods bought 2? Well I am sure he could afford it (no offense Tiger).

Don't get me wrong, Tiger Woods = excellent athlete, superb golfer in all respects, Tiger Woods != Astrophysicist. Using stars to promote products is just a an ol bandwagon technique. If the QLink could make me play golf like Tiger, I would be all over that monkey.

Now if the thing was in "Popular Science" or some creditable science magazine of the sort, I might look into this more.
Posted by phenger  on  Tue Jul 19, 2005  at  11:26 AM
Let
Posted by Steve  in  Seattle  on  Fri Oct 28, 2005  at  01:00 PM
I was brought aware of this product today from someone trying to get me involved in a pyramid business. I have to admit that the fact of radiation from electronics is a very real issue, but I do not believe that this product has a real benefit. Not to mention the fact that at the end of the information video it states(but only for a brief second) "This product is not intended to cure, or prevent any diseases". After they spend ten minutes saying that it will help stop cancers and feelings of pain and fatigue caused by EMF radiation. BUt of course they have many people claiming they feel much better after using the product. The way I see it placebo's have been known to cure diseases and shows signs of improvement from people suffering from ADD. It all just shows that the biggest disease in the modern world is FEAR!
Posted by Joseph  in  Prince Edward Island  on  Mon Jan 23, 2006  at  06:30 PM
Joseph said:

"...I do not believe that this product has a real benefit. Not to mention the fact that at the end of the information video it states(but only for a brief second) "This product is not intended to cure, or prevent any diseases"."

Joseph, if you watch TV, you'll see that all the quack crap sold on it has a disclaimer that says "This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease." I assume this is a standardized phrase, possibly mandated by the FDA since it's always worded the same way. Everytime I see it, I think, "Uh, if it doesn't do at least one of those four things, what the hell would I want it for?" After all, "treat" is pretty vague. If a product can't even "treat" whatever my ailment is, isn't it worthless?
Posted by Cranky Media Guy  on  Tue Jan 24, 2006  at  03:24 AM
"The BIOPRO Econo Fuel Chips are charged with a proprietary blend of resonant frequencies."

To me this says they are charging this chip with resonant frequencies, would this not make this so called chip an AC battery? If so why are the electric co. not using this technology for storing AC electricity that they generate?
Posted by Alfie  on  Thu Jan 26, 2006  at  08:54 PM
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