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Automotive Bermuda Triangle
In 2006 I posted about the road of non-starting cars in the town of Gosport, England. An unknown force on this road was preventing cars from starting. I don't know if Gosport ever solved its problem, but it seems that the neighborhood around the Empire State Building in New York City is experiencing the same issue.

The New York Daily News reports:

In the shadow of the Empire State Building lies an “automotive Bermuda Triangle” - a five-block radius where vehicles mysteriously die. No one is sure what’s causing it, but all roads appear to lead to the looming giant in our midst - specifically, its Art Deco mast and 203-foot-long, antenna-laden spire...

The Empire State Building Co., which refused to provide the Daily News a list of its antennas, denied it has created any “adverse impact” on automobiles.
“If the claim were indeed true, the streets in the vicinity of the building would be constantly littered with disabled vehicles,” the building’s owner said.
According to many doormen in the area, they often are.

I said it back in 2006, and I'll say it again. Problems like these are obviously the result of inner-earth dwellers and their infernal electromagnetic pulse machines. When will people wise up?
Categories: PlacesTechnology
Posted by The Curator on Tue Jan 29, 2008
OK, do I have to be the scifi geek again? Doctor Who Season 3 (new series). When the Empire State Building was being put up, the few remaining Daleks in this universe were using the building to make more of themselves. They used the building itself, or at least the radio tower. And it's the same building around which the imperfect humans park their cars. Coincidence? I think not!
Posted by leshka  in  New York City  on  Tue Jan 29, 2008  at  09:22 AM
Are circles the new triangles? Damn, I'll never get a grasp on this new geometry.
Posted by Charybdis  in  Hell  on  Tue Jan 29, 2008  at  09:53 AM
Alex, people will wise up a week from this Thursday.
Posted by PiltdownHacker  in  Uckfield, East Success, UK  on  Tue Jan 29, 2008  at  10:38 AM
Definitely radio interference from something. Being a geek about these things, and having a dad that helps run an Amateur Radio TV station, they like looking into things like this. When new cars first started installing more electronics like this there was an article(15+ years ago) about how cars 'mysteriously' died on a certain stretch of road.
It was pretty clearly caused by the megawatts of TV tower transmission on poorly shielded electronics.

In these ones though, if there is nothing new installed, I'd say someone is running something illegally, or a prankster is deliberately jamming(for fun).
Posted by AussieBruce  on  Tue Jan 29, 2008  at  11:00 AM
If someone would plot the numbers and coordinate the distance from the Empire State Building, it could be shown that there wasa connection. Power from radios drops off with the square of the distance, therefore, more disabled cars would be closer to the building and fewer as the distance increased. The shielding in the cars may be faulty as well, allowing more energy to enter the circuits than is safe.
Posted by Christopher Cole  in  Tucson, AZ  on  Tue Jan 29, 2008  at  12:15 PM
Sometimes, I play my guitar thru my 1963, two-tube, 15watt Danelectro amp with the 8inch speaker. As to whether that alters the electromagnetic field around the ESB is inconclusive at present, but I have my suspicions. Rock on
Posted by Hairy Houdini  on  Tue Jan 29, 2008  at  10:57 PM
I was thinking along the same lines as many other posters - electronic ignitions and fuel injection systems can be knocked out by EMP. Police departments have been trying for years to develop effective focused EMP tools to knock out people running from the cops. It wouldn't surprise me at all given the power being distributed via radio, TV, etc. signals around major antennae like the ones on the Empire state building would cause a higher than average frequency of electrical failures in nearby areas.
Posted by Eric g  in  Arnaudville Louisiana  on  Wed Feb 13, 2008  at  11:43 AM
time to call Mulder and Sculley, Love this freaky stuff
Posted by paint protection  on  Fri May 02, 2008  at  08:39 AM
Yes, electronic ignitions and fuel injection systems can be knocked out by EMP. However, not all police departments are able to develop effective focused EMP tools to knock out people running from the cops. I think they should hire freelancer from Freelancer.com to get the job done. They have a lot of freelancers who are expert in electronics. They can use this code TURBOCIRCUITS to get more advantages from the site.
Posted by Milka Giordano  on  Tue Nov 17, 2009  at  10:34 PM
There are 12 TV transmitters and 19 FM transmitters on the Empire State Building. After 9/11 a bunch of those transmitters were rebuilt on the Empire State. You have likely a good 2 megawatts of transmitter power, with digital TV being notoriously spread-spectrum with lots of harmonics. The remote start fobs are real low power, so it's vulnerable to jamming.

Because of bandwidth, TV transmitters need to be really high power, up to a quarter megawatt or even more. FM transmitters can range from 100 watts (like a college station) on up to 100 kilowatts. Add it up, and the spire will be very bright in the FM and UHF TV bands!

Then, consider "heterodyning" where frequencies mix creating new frequencies to cause fun. Too bad the landlord company won't disclose the TV and radio stations who are tenants. If you could find out, the FCC keeps a database so you could find out each's power and add away.
Posted by Anonymous  on  Mon Dec 07, 2009  at  06:03 PM
Hey, dude!Definitely radio intervention from something.Police departments have been trying for years to develop effective focused EMP tools to knock out people running from the cops.
Posted by Robinson Henry  in  74 Walters Drive Perth, WA 6000, Australia  on  Mon Mar 14, 2011  at  05:53 AM
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