The Museum of Hoaxes
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The most sacred relic: the Holy Foreskin, circa 800 AD
The Society for Indecency to Naked Animals, 1959
September Morn, the painting that shocked the censor, 1913
Jennifer Love Hewitt's Disappearing Breasts
The Instant Color TV Hoax, 1962
Loch Ness Monster Hoaxes
Use your left ear to detect lies
Snowball the Monster Cat, 2000
Tourist Guy 9/11 Hoax, Sep 2001
Dead Body of Loch Ness Monster Found, 1972
Pizza Delivery Prank Goes Wrong
Ordering pizzas to the house of someone who didn't expect to get them is one of the oldest pranks around. The concept dates all the way back to the Berners Street Hoax of 1810 (although that prank involved just about everything except pizza being delivered to a woman's front door). Here's a case of the prank being perpetrated long-distance, from over a continent away:
A Singapore Airlines pilot accused of making prank calls about a colleague in B.C. could be facing a hefty fine -- and up to three years in jail -- if found guilty. Looi Kang San, 53, was charged in Singapore last week with making four prank calls from there to three Canadian fast-food outlets for food to be delivered to the home of Steven Cameron Gillis in Surrey, the Straits Times reported. Looi is said to have called on Nov. 11 last year to Canadian Pizza and McDonald's for food to be delivered to Gillis, also a Singapore Airlines pilot. The following day, he allegedly called Kentucky Fried Chicken and made a second call to Canadian Pizza. When reached at home, Gillis, 57, declined to comment, but alluded that there was more to the story.

I've never heard of anyone facing serious punishment for this prank, but Looi has been suspended from his job because of it, and that's just the start:
Looi's passport has been impounded and he is out on bail for $8,000 Singapore dollars, or about $5,322 Cdn. A pre-trial conference has been scheduled for this Tuesday. Under Singapore's Telecommunications Act, anyone who transmits a false message by phone can be fined up to $10,000 Singapore dollars ($6,652 Cdn) and jailed for up to three years.

I'm making a note to myself never to order pizza to someone who doesn't want it while in Singapore!
Categories: Pranks
Posted by The Curator on Tue Oct 16, 2007
Comments (12)
I didn't know McDonalds delivered.
Posted by Captain Al  in  Vancouver Island, Canada  on  Tue Oct 16, 2007  at  08:54 PM
I've had a friend once who crank called himself. I couldnt work out the logic of it, but he called for a pizza to come to his own home, and then acted all bewildered when it arrived.
Huh? He never explained how that was funny.
Posted by AussieBruce  on  Wed Oct 17, 2007  at  10:57 AM
Aussiebruce, thats hilarious! snake
Posted by outeast  in  prague  on  Wed Oct 17, 2007  at  11:26 AM
Yes, indeed, Outeast! My knees pains me from all the slapping!
Posted by Ric  on  Wed Oct 17, 2007  at  03:35 PM
Oh wow, is anyone NOT surprised that it is Singapore that has such a law? The country where you can get your rear publically whipped for chewing gum? And how ever heard of calling international long-distance for a crank? That can get expensive. Just another reason I guess why Singapore will never be one of my vacation spots.
Posted by Christopher Cole  in  Tucson, AZ  on  Thu Oct 18, 2007  at  01:56 PM
You can chew gum in Singapore. The chewing of gum has never been banned. SELLING chewing gum is mostly banned.
Posted by Floormaster Squeeze  in  Spring Hill, MA  on  Thu Oct 18, 2007  at  05:29 PM
My goodnes! That IS excessive jail time for 4 prank calls! I knew a guy , here in the U.S., who got only one year in jail for punching a cop while drunk. What would that get you in Singapore?
Posted by bob with boobs  in  usa  on  Sat Oct 20, 2007  at  10:15 PM
lmao i did that
Posted by imlitupagain  in  dfgfdhsfd  on  Sun Oct 21, 2007  at  09:11 PM
This didn't happen in Singapore, it happened in British Columbia, Canada. Surrey is a city near Vancouver, the Straits Times is a newspaper published in Vancouver, and Canadian Pizza should probably have been a pretty big clue as to being in Canada. The men involved worked for Singapore AIRLINES, there is nothing in the article to indicate they lived in Singapore.
Posted by JD  in  BC, Canada  on  Sun Nov 04, 2007  at  04:52 PM
JD:

Looi Kang San, 53, was charged in Singapore last week with making four prank calls from there to three Canadian fast-food outlets...

Also reported elsewhere, too - for example, in the here-babelfished GCP news:

According to Sing Tao Daily news, the pilots of a Singapore Airlines extremely boring, even a long-distance call from Singapore to the British Columbia called take-away, of living in the prank, colleagues, in addition to a fine, there may be imprisonment for three years.
Posted by outeast  in  prague  on  Mon Nov 05, 2007  at  03:25 AM
I stand corrected.
Posted by JD  on  Thu Nov 08, 2007  at  01:53 AM
Jokes!

I work in a pizza delivery service and do not like these jokers.
While we may only adds an these numbers in black list (((
Posted by Доставка пиццы Одесса  in  Odessa  on  Thu May 20, 2010  at  12:07 PM
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