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The Hoax Museum Blog
Category: Places
Colorful Coastal Village
Posted by The Curator on Wed May 07, 2008
This looks like it would be a great place to visit. It's Cinque Terre in Italy. Unfortunately, it's not quite so colorful in real life. (via City Comforts)
Categories: Photos/Videos, Places Comments (6)
Eiffel Tower Observation Deck
Posted by The Curator on Fri Apr 04, 2008
Pictures have been circulating showing an expanded observation deck that is supposedly going to be added to the Eiffel Tower, transforming it into something resembling a giant mushroom. An article in the Guardian stated: Serero Architects of Paris has won the competition to redesign the structure's public viewing platform and reception areas. The winning design (above), which will be 276 metres (905ft) above the ground, will not require any permanent modification of the existing structure. It will double the capacity of the public viewing area on the tower's top floor...
Categories: Photos/Videos, Places Comments (4)
Padded Lampposts Protext Text-Messagers
Posted by The Curator on Tue Mar 18, 2008
A few weeks ago a story was going around about a street in London where the lampposts had been padded in order to protect text-messaging pedestrians. Neo posted about it in the forum. The story sounded pretty ridiculous, and sure enough it turns out to have been a publicity-stunt hoax. The padding was placed on the lampposts by a pr firm, and it was only there for a day and a half. The Press Gazette reports: Journalists across the world reported that Britain’s first “safe text” street had…
Categories: Places, Technology Comments (4)
Automotive Bermuda Triangle
Posted by The Curator on Tue Jan 29, 2008
In 2006 I posted about the road of non-starting cars in the town of Gosport, England. An unknown force on this road was preventing cars from starting. I don't know if Gosport ever solved its problem, but it seems that the neighborhood around the Empire State Building in New York City is experiencing the same issue. The New York Daily News reports: In the shadow of the Empire State Building lies an “automotive Bermuda Triangle” - a five-block radius where vehicles mysteriously die. No one is sure…
Categories: Places, Technology Comments (11)
The Unrecognised States Numismatic Society
Posted by The Curator on Fri Jan 25, 2008
The Unrecognised States Numismatic Society (USNS) describes itself as a "group catering to numismatists whose collecting interests largely focus on coins minted by groups purporting, pretending or appearing to be sovereign states, but which are not recognised as such by established governments." They've got examples of coins from a bunch of unrecognized nations, including the Principality of Sealand, Atlantis, the Confederation of Antarctica, and the Dominion of West Florida, which apparently is "an internet-based micronation created on 29 November, 2005... founded on an eccentric interpretation of actual historic events." The Dominion has a website! My favorite coin is that of the
Categories: Business/Finance, Places Comments (3)
Fictitious Countries
Posted by The Curator on Thu Jan 10, 2008
Elliot has posted five new articles in the hoaxipedia. His theme was fictitious countries. Or rather, countries of an ambiguous legal status. The Principality of New Utopia An island "country" in the Caribbean established in 1999 by Oklahoma businessman Howard Turney, who prefers to be known as HSH Prince Lazarus. The Dominion of Melchizedek A South Pacific island country, that happens to be entirely underwater. It was founded in 1987 by California father and son Evan and Mark Pedley. The Kingdom of Redonda A tiny uninhabited island near the Caribbean island of Montserrat that the British science-fiction author M.P. Shiel claimed…
Categories: Places Comments (14)
Phantom Tent City on Roof
Posted by The Curator on Thu Jan 03, 2008
According to a rumor that circulates among the population of South Carolina's Hilton Head Island, there's a group of Mexican immigrants living on top of one of the local supermarkets. It may be the Bi-Lo Supermarket, or the Port Royal Plaza, or the Harris Teeter. Supposedly this tent city of roof-living immigrants tapped into the store's electricity and even diverted the air conditioning system to cool their tents. The Island Packet News is pretty sure that the story of the rooftop tent city is just an urban legend: by all official accounts -- and satellite imagery available through…
Categories: Places, Urban Legends Comments (6)
Phallus in Football Field
Posted by The Curator on Thu Dec 06, 2007
In the summer of 2004 pranksters used herbicide to trace the outline of a giant phallus in the football field located inside Harman-Geist Stadium in Northeastern Pennsylvania. When the grass died, the phallus became visible. Maintenance crews did their best to hide the phallus by painting it green, but eventually the paint wore away. And now the prank has succeeded in reaching an even wider audience, thanks to satellite technology. Overhead satellite imagery of the stadium -- and giant phallus -- has shown up on google maps. You can see it for yourself by searching for the address "300 N. Cedar St., Hazleton, Pa." and then zooming in to…
Categories: Places, Pranks, Sports Comments (2)
Porthemmet Beach
Posted by The Curator on Thu Sep 27, 2007
The website for Porthemmet Beach advertises that it is the best beach in Cornwall. It also claims that it's the only beach in the UK to allow topless sunbathing. So how does one find this beach? These are the directions on the website: Porthemmet is very easy to get to from anywhere in Cornwall. Head north up the A30 until you see the signs. They are very clear, you can't miss it! It should be noted that there is a private joke in Cornwall whereby locals will pretend to not know where Porthemmet Beach…
Categories: Places, Websites Comments (17)
Vernon, Florida
Posted by The Curator on Tue Sep 04, 2007
Joe Littrell forwarded me a St. Petersburg Times article, Dismembered Again, about the town of Vernon, Florida. It was so weird that I first I thought it was one of those joke articles, the kind that magazines such as the Phoenix New Times sometimes run. But all the references in it check out, so now I'm pretty sure it's real. Vernon used to be known as Nub City, because the main source of income for town residents was dismembering themselves in order to file insurance claims. People there would come up with all kinds of ingenious ways to lose limbs:
Categories: Body Manipulation, Places Comments (6)
New From Elliot: Brooklyn Bridge Scams
Posted by The Curator on Thu Aug 30, 2007
Elliot's latest addition to the Hoaxipedia details scams involving the Brooklyn Bridge. I like this one in particular: In 1886, not long after the Brooklyn Bridge opened, another famous scam was perpetrated by a Brooklyn bookie named Steve Brodie. According to the story, Brodie’s scam originated in a bet with a Brooklyn bartender named Chuck Connors. The bookie wagered Connors that he could jump off the Brooklyn Bridge and survive the fall. Steve Brodie ultimately won the bet and wound up becoming a major New York City celebrity and legend. It was discovered years later that Brodie had actually pushed…
Categories: Con Artists, Places Comments (5)
Algeria’s River of Ink
Posted by The Curator on Fri Aug 17, 2007
The Proceedings of the Athanasius Kircher Society has posted an interesting geographical puzzle. An article, "The Story of Ink," in the 1930 issue of the American Journal of Pharmacy included the following statement: Iron tannin inks are sometimes formed naturally; such a phenomenon has been observed in Algeria, a country in northern Africa, where there exists a "river of ink." Chemical examinations of the waters of the streams combining to form this river revealed that one of the streams is impregnated with iron from the soil through which it flows while the other stream carries tannin from a peat swamp. When the…
The Bermuda Triangle of Cats
Posted by The Curator on Tue Aug 14, 2007
Cats are disappearing from the town of Stourbridge in the West Midlands. Up to 40 lost cats have been reported so far, all from the same small neighborhood. Metro.co.uk reports: The pets disappeared from just a few streets and no signs of any of them have ever been found. Some families lost as many as three cats, one after the other. But there is one resident who, like others in the town of Stourbridge, refuses to believe it's just a coincidence. 'It really is a bit of a Bermuda Triangle for cats,' said Julie Wottoon. She has started a campaign…
Categories: Animals, Places Comments (12)
Moving Rocks of Death Valley
Posted by The Curator on Tue Aug 14, 2007
On Flickr someone with the screenname "melastmohican" has uploaded a picture of a "moving rock" located in the Racetrack Playa region of Death Valley, California. The caption reads: Deep in the heart of the California desert lies one of the natural world's most puzzling mysteries: the moving rocks of Death Valley. These are not ordinary moving rocks that tumble down mountainsides in avalanches, are carried along riverbeds by flowing water, or are tossed aside by animals. These rocks, some as heavy as 700 pounds, are inexplicably…
Categories: Photos/Videos, Places Comments (27)
The Great Cornish Shark Hoax
Posted by The Curator on Thu Aug 09, 2007
Kevin Keeble stirred up a lot of excitement when he sent pictures to the Newquay Guardian showing a great white shark that he claimed to have spotted about a mile off the coast of Cornwall. At the time he said, "We were out about one mile off Towan Head and I saw this fin in the distance. We were reeling in the mackerel but I picked up my camera and caught a picture with my telephoto lens. The shark was about 100ft away. It was only there for a few seconds before it disappeared." A shark mania ensued. Others sharks…
Categories: Animals, Places Comments (1)
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