The Museum of Hoaxes
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Did Poe say 'The best things in life make you sweaty'?
Mencken's fake history of the bathtub, 1917
Old-Time Photo Fakery, 1900 to 1919
What do the lines on Solo cups mean?
Bonsai Kittens, 2000
The Cradle of the Deep, a literary hoax, 1929
The Society for Indecency to Naked Animals, 1959
Stotham, Massachusetts: the town that didn't exist, 1920
Sober Sue, the woman who never smiled, 1907
Jean Gauntt, the Immortal Baby, 1939
U.S. Army Releases Doctored Photographs
The U.S. Army at Fort Stewart in Georgia released two photos of recently deceased soldiers, Sgt. Wesley Durbin (top) and Staff Sgt. Darris Dawson (bottom). The two sergeants had been killed in the same incident, shot by another soldier at a base in Iraq.

Bob Owen, chief photographer of the San Antonio Express-News, noticed that the photos were almost identical. All details were the same except for the soldiers' face, name, and rank. It appeared that Dawson's head had been pasted onto Durbin's body.

The Associated Press subsequently issued a retraction order on the photos, noting for each photo that "The content of this image has been digitally altered and does not accurately reflect the scene."

The army later apologized for the incident, explaining that, since Dawson's unit did not have an official photo of him, one had been created for a memorial service. The photo had apparently been released to the media by accident.

Links and References
• McGinley, Megan. (Sep 19, 2008). Army Alters Photographs, issues them to AP. Columbia Journalism Review.


All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.