The Museum of Hoaxes
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Bonsai Kittens, 2000
Fake Photos of Very Large Animals
Dead Body of Loch Ness Monster Found, 1972
Female thieves hide money in their bras, 1950
Vilcabamba, the town of very old people, 1978
The Hitler Diary Hoax, 1983
Sober Sue, the woman who never smiled, 1907
BMW's April Fool's Day Hoaxes
Swiss peasants harvest spaghetti from trees, 1957
The Stone-Age Tasaday Hoax, 1971
The Tydings Affair
In 1950 Millard Tydings (a U.S. Senator from Maryland) challenged Senator Joseph McCarthy by calling his allegation that hundreds of communists were working in the State Department "a fraud, a hoax, and a deceit." As payback, McCarthy's staff faked a picture (top) of Tydings (on the right) apparently chatting with Earl Browder (on the left), head of the American Communist Party. The truth was that Tydings had never even met Browder before July, 1950. The image was a composite of a 1938 photo of Tydings listening to the radio (middle) and a 1940 photo of Browder delivering a speech (bottom).

The photo was widely distributed shortly before the 1950 senate race in which Tydings ran against John Butler. It appeared in a pamphlet titled "From the Record" printed by a group calling itself Young Democrats for Butler. A caption acknowledged the photo was a composite. Nevertheless, the image is believed to have contributed to Tydings' subsequent defeat in the election.

Links and References
• "Faked photo shows Tydings and Browder." (Nov 8, 1950). The Washington Post.
Millard Tydings, Wikipedia.
Photo Categories: Composite Images, Politics, 1940-1959


All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.