The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
Swiss peasants harvest spaghetti from trees, 1957
Man flies by own lung power, 1934
The most sacred relic: the Holy Foreskin, circa 800 AD
The damp spot that hoaxed a city, 1912
The disumbrationist art hoax, 1924
Fake Fish Photos
Female thieves hide money in their bras, 1950
The Great New York Zoo Escape Hoax, 1874
Eccentric's last prank, 66 years after his death, 1900
Iceberg floats into Sydney Harbor, 1978
The Melon Party
A postcard created by Alfred Stanley Johnson of Waupun, Wisconsin. The top image shows the original, unedited picture which Johnson used to create the trick effect. The children posed, holding wooden props. Johnson then cut and pasted a picture of a watermelon slice into this picture to create the finished postcard (bottom): an illusion of a children's party featuring a giant watermelon.

Tall-tale postcards experienced the peak of their popularity from 1905 to 1915, but cards of this kind are still being created and sent today. And the internet, combined with software that makes it easier than ever to manipulate images, has breathed new life into the genre of tall-tale photography.

Links and References
Rubin, C.E. & Williams, M. (1990). Larger Than Life: The American Tall-Tale Postcard, 1905-1915. Abbeville Press: p. 108.


All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.