The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
Loch Ness Monster Hoaxes
Bonsai Kittens, 2000
What do the lines on Solo cups mean?
The Stone-Age Tasaday Hoax, 1971
Paul Krassner's Stereophonic Hoax, 1960
The boy with the golden tooth, 1593
Female thieves hide money in their bras, 1950
'Solar Armor' freezes man in Nevada Desert, 1874
The Gallery of Fake Viral Images
Pierre Brassau, Monkey Artist, 1964
The Melon Party
A postcard created by Alfred Stanley Johnson of Waupun, Wisconsin. The top image shows the original, unedited picture which Johnson used to create the trick effect. The children posed, holding wooden props. Johnson then cut and pasted a picture of a watermelon slice into this picture to create the finished postcard (bottom): an illusion of a children's party featuring a giant watermelon.

Tall-tale postcards experienced the peak of their popularity from 1905 to 1915, but cards of this kind are still being created and sent today. And the internet, combined with software that makes it easier than ever to manipulate images, has breathed new life into the genre of tall-tale photography.

Links and References
Rubin, C.E. & Williams, M. (1990). Larger Than Life: The American Tall-Tale Postcard, 1905-1915. Abbeville Press: p. 108.


All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.