The Museum of Hoaxes
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Adolf Hitler Baby Photo Hoax, 1933
Man flies by own lung power, 1934
The Man-Eating Tree of Madagascar Hoax, 1874
The Nobody For President Campaign, 1940 to Present
'Solar Armor' freezes man in Nevada Desert, 1874
Can a bar of soap between your sheets ease muscle cramps?
Actress who claimed she was kidnapped by puritans, 1950
Script of Casablanca rejected, 1982
Vilcabamba, the town of very old people, 1978
Lord Gordon-Gordon, robber of the robber barons, 1871
The Fake General Dunwoody
In November 2008 Ann Dunwoody was promoted to the rank of four-star general, making her the first female four-star general in U.S. history. To publicize the event, the U.S. Army released a photo of Dunwoody to the media. However, Bob Owen, Director of Photography at the San Antonio Express-News, noticed that the image (top) appeared to have been altered, and he soon found the original version (bottom) on the internet.

In the original image, Dunwoody could be seen sitting in an office with a bookshelf behind her. This background had been replaced by a U.S. flag. In addition, her face had been smoothed to make her appear more youthful.

The Army insisted the manipulation of the photo did not violate army policy, which only prohibits the editing of images "to misrepresent the facts or change the circumstances of an event."

Nevertheless, since this was the second incident in two months in which the Army had been caught supplying altered images to the media (see the case of Staff Sgt. Dawson from Sep. 2008), the Associated Press suspended the further use of photos provided by the Defense Department.

Links and References
• Row over altered US Army photo. (Nov 19, 2008). BBC.
• Army manipulated general's photo. (Nov. 15, 2008). Associated Press.
• Photoshop, Part III. (Nov. 14, 2008). Columbia Journalism Review.


All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.