The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
Mule elected G.O.P. committeeman, 1938
Did Paul McCartney die on Nov. 9, 1966?
Loch Ness Monster Hoaxes
The Diaphote, a television hoax, 1880
Tube of liquor hidden in prohibition-era boot, 1920s
Cat that walked 3000 miles to find its owners, 1951
Taco Bells buys the Liberty Bell, 1996
Actress who claimed she was kidnapped by puritans, 1950
What do the lines on Solo cups mean?
Brief History of Triple-Decker Buses
High-Pressure Hijinks
A soldier appears to be lifted in the air by the pressure from a water hose. The source of this photo is uncertain. Mark Sloan credits it to "The New York Times; courtesy National Archives and Wide World Photos."

It is unlikely the soldier actually was lifted in the air by the pressure from the hose. For a start, the blast from the hose is not directed at his center of gravity. Therefore, it would not be pushing him upwards. Some have noted that the soldier resembles Buster Keaton. If it is Keaton, then this may be a scene from a movie, in which case the effect most likely was created with hidden wires. Although the picture was obviously intended as a joke, its status is listed as undetermined since it is not clear what technique was used to create it.

Links and References
Sloan, M. (1990). Hoaxes, Humbugs, and Spectacles. Villard Books: p.114.


All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.