The Museum of Hoaxes
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Princess Caraboo, servant girl who became a princess, 1817
Dog wins art contest, 1974
The Crown Prince Regent of Thulia, 1954
Stotham, Massachusetts: the town that didn't exist, 1920
Life discovered on the moon, 1835
Script of Casablanca rejected, 1982
Jernegan's Gold Accumulator Scam, 1898
Baby Yoga, aka Swinging Your Kid Around Your Head
A black lion: real or fake?
Tube of liquor hidden in prohibition-era boot, 1920s
Bloody Sunday, 1905
On January 22, 1905 (January 9 in the Old Style calendar) workers in St. Petersburg marched toward the Winter Palace intending to hand a petition to Tsar Nicholas II. Soldiers stopped them at the Narva Gate and opened fire. In Russia the day came to be known as Bloody Sunday. The event exposed the brutality of the Russian police and undermined popular support for the Tsarist regime.

In 1925 director Vyacheslav Viskovsky made a propaganda film about Bloody Sunday titled Devyatoe Yanvarya (January 9). The film included a reenactment of the soldiers firing on the crowd. This image shows the reenactment. (It is not clear whether it is a retouched still from the film itself, or a photograph that was taken during the filming.)

The image was more dramatic than any existing photographs of the Bloody Sunday massacre, and was soon distributed by the Soviet Tass News agency, which described it as an actual photograph of the 1905 event. Later it appeared in numerous Soviet textbooks, again presented as a photograph of the event itself, not as a staged reenactment.

Links and References
• Alain Jaubert. (1989). Making People Disappear: An amazing chronicle of photographic deception.
Photo Categories: Staged Scene, Military, War, Politics, 1920-1939


All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.