Making real medicine out of traditional Chinese medicine?
Posted: 29 May 2013 01:26 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I… am conflicted about this.

On the one hand, you have Traditional Chinese Medicine, which is pretty much one of my ‘hot buttons’. Not the medicine itself, mind, although anything that wipes out entire species of rhino, or has caged tigers to harvest their bile isn’t all sunshine and roses. No, I’m annoyed by the pseudoscientific bastards who use it to bolster their own quackery and nostrums.

On the other hand… you have the medical community actually analyzing the stuff, saying ‘Ok, is there any ACTUAL benefit to this tea made of mulch and seahorses?’.

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2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
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Posted: 30 May 2013 03:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Nothing wrong with quantitive research into these things. Although clearly tiger bone or rhino horn shouldn’t really be used, I think it would be approriate for them to test some to prove it is worthless, after all bones are likely the same whatever the animal and horn is the same as nails/hair basically.

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Posted: 31 May 2013 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yeah.. I just hope that it really is actual, bona-fide testing, an dnot just ginning up some results that ‘prove’ the stuff ‘works’...

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1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

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Posted: 01 June 2013 09:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Robin Bobcat - 31 May 2013 06:35 PM

Yeah.. I just hope that it really is actual, bona-fide testing, an dnot just ginning up some results that ‘prove’ the stuff ‘works’...

I guess we’ll have to wait until the results are published to find out.

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Posted: 02 June 2013 03:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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As long as the testing is bona fide (bone for fido?) I don’t mind them testing traditional Chinese medicine. They might a few things that actually work.

I remember hearing about how, in the past, Australian Indigenous people stumbled across cures by using fungus. So it’s not impossible we could find some benefit from study of traditional medicines.

Of course use of things like using tiger bone and rhino horn should be banned in my opinion.

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