{paginate}
1 of 1
{/paginate}
James McCormick guilty of selling fake bomb detectors
Posted: 23 April 2013 08:54 AM   [ Ignore ]
Senior Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  534
Joined  2009-08-10

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22266051

Millionaire businessman James McCormick, 56, has been convicted at the Old Bailey of three counts of fraud after selling fake bomb detectors.

The Advanced Detection Equipment was based on a golf ball finder device and sold for up to $40,000 (£27,000) in Iraq, Georgia, Saudi Arabia and Niger.

McCormick, of Langport, Somerset, said to have made £50m from sales of the devices, will be sentenced next month.

An Iraqi bomb victim described him as a “morally bankrupt” man.

More at the link.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 April 2013 02:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6930
Joined  2005-10-21

Huzzah! Score one for reality versus stupid dowsing rods!

I know it says he knew they didn’t work, but I have to wonder if he at some level actually believed them to work, or was just chortling happily as folks purchased his toys?

 Signature 

1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 April 2013 03:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Senior Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  534
Joined  2009-08-10

I wonder how the demonstrations played out. Did he use a variety of explosives and then just press a concealed button to set off the indicator? Because there is no other way they could have worked. I think he must have been scamming since he started; I do hope the judge gives him the maximum possible sentence.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 April 2013 02:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Senior Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  404
Joined  2005-10-26

Its the modern dowsing rod. It ‘works’ because the operator subtly caused the antenna to swivel when they think they have found something. So, very easy to fake that it is doing something. In a rigged test, you can always ‘find’ the bomb. In a double blind, it had worse than random chance results.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 May 2013 03:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6930
Joined  2005-10-21

Verdict handed down. The judge has sentenced him to 10 years in jail - the maximum he could give. Pretty certain he’d have gone more if he could have, as he was NOT kind in his statements.

 Signature 

1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 May 2013 10:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  61098
Joined  2005-04-14
Robin Bobcat - 02 May 2013 03:52 PM

Verdict handed down. The judge has sentenced him to 10 years in jail - the maximum he could give.

Apparently, it is ten years. . .on each of three charges.  And he has to serve a minimum of half of the time on each charge before he can even be considered for having his time reduced.  So fifteen years at least, thirty years at most.  Given the ire that the justice system has shown towards him, and his cavalier attitude towards the whole thing and the lack of any sign of remorse, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he was denied early release.

 Signature 

“If any man wish to write in a clear style, let him be first clear in his thoughts.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 May 2013 08:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5527
Joined  2007-03-14
Accipiter - 02 May 2013 10:37 PM
Robin Bobcat - 02 May 2013 03:52 PM

Verdict handed down. The judge has sentenced him to 10 years in jail - the maximum he could give.

Apparently, it is ten years. . .on each of three charges.  And he has to serve a minimum of half of the time on each charge before he can even be considered for having his time reduced.  So fifteen years at least, thirty years at most.  Given the ire that the justice system has shown towards him, and his cavalier attitude towards the whole thing and the lack of any sign of remorse, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he was denied early release.

Do the sentences run cocurrently or consecutively?

 Signature 

Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you’re a mile away and you have their shoes.

Seen on a tshirt - “If life gives you melons you may be dyslexic”

When life hands you lemons make apple juice. Then laugh while life tries to figure out how you did it.

My blog
My Website

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 May 2013 03:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Senior Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  404
Joined  2005-10-26

I find this image quite revealing:-

Its from
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2318182/British-millionaire-James-McCormick-jailed-selling-fake-bomb-detectors-Iraq-UN.html

The device in the center is a cheap novelty golf ball finder. The 2 devices either side are his $multi-thousand bomb detectors(first version anyway). You cant tell me they didnt come out of the same factory molds.

Profile
 
 
   
{paginate}
1 of 1
{/paginate}