Florida DJs may be charged for telling listeners that “dihydrogen monoxide” is running down their taps
Posted: 09 April 2013 02:09 PM   [ Ignore ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  8381
Joined  2005-04-17

http://www.zmescience.com/science/chemistry/chemistry-dj-florida-03042013/

Published on Wed, Apr 3, 2013 by Mihai Andrei

Post filled in: Chemistry

Florida country radio morning-show hosts Val St. John and Scott Fish are currently serving indefinite suspensions and possibly criminal charges for what can only be described as a successful April Fools. They told their listeners that “dihydrogen monoxide” was coming out of the taps throughout the Fort Myers area – as I’m sure you all know, dihydrogen monoxide, or H2O is nothing but water.

As it turns out, their readers unwittingly panicked so much that Lee County utility officials had to issue a county-wide statement calming the fears of chemistry impaired Floridians.

molecueI wasn’t really able to find any audio evidence of how this prank was played because now authorities are trying to prove the DJs are guilty of a felony; they may have pushed it a little too far. Now, I’m not really familiar with Florida laws but… technically, they didn’t say anything wrong – I mean, it’s the same as telling people there’s a potent parasympathomimetic alkaloid (nicotine) in their cigarettes or Streptococcus thermophilus bacteria in their yogurt. I can understand them being suspended if things escalated to this level (though again, it was a really successful April Fools), but facing a felony charge because the gross majority of Florida doesn’t even know the chemical formula of water? If anything, I’d penalize the education system.

  “My understanding is it is a felony to call in a false water quality issue,” Diane Holm, a public information officer for Lee County, told WTSP, while Renda stood firm about his deejays: “They will have to deal with the circumstances.”

I was pretty curious about this, so I called my family and some friends and told them to be careful, because dihydrogen monoxide has leaked into the tap water. The answers I got varied from “What… water?” to “You’re stupid”.

But apparently, calling water by its scientific name is a false water quality issue, blamed by both the authorities and the general public. A poll conducted on GatorCountry asked if the 2 should return to radio, and 78 percent of the answers were ‘Never‘. Sheesh… I just hope all these people would sit down, get a big cup, infuse some Camellia sinensis in dihydrogen monoxide, grab a graphite based writing implement and a chemistry manual, and thoroughly read it and take notes.

 Signature 

SilentTone: hulitoons blog of just plain silliness?
UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are.)”  So, I AM because WE are

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 02:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  8381
Joined  2005-04-17

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dihydrogen_monoxide_hoax

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

  “Dihydrogen monoxide” redirects here. For the H2O molecule, see Properties of water.

Water consists of two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom.

The dihydrogen monoxide hoax involves calling water by an unfamiliar name, “dihydrogen monoxide”, followed by a listing of real effects of this chemical, often presented as an argument that this substance should be regulated, labeled as hazardous, or banned. The hoax is intended to illustrate how the lack of scientific literacy and an exaggerated analysis can lead to misplaced fears.[1] “Dihydrogen monoxide”, shortened to “DHMO”, is a name for water that is consistent with basic rules of chemical nomenclature,[2] but is not among the names published by IUPAC[3] and is almost exclusively used in humorous context.

A popular version of the hoax was created by Eric Lechner, Lars Norpchen and Matthew Kaufman, housemates while attending University of California, Santa Cruz in 1990,[4] revised by Craig Jackson (also a UC Santa Cruz student) in 1994,[5] and brought to widespread public attention in 1997 when Nathan Zohner, a 14-year-old student, gathered petitions to ban “DHMO” as the basis of his science project, titled “How Gullible Are We?”.[6]

“Dihydrogen monoxide” may sound dangerous to those with a limited knowledge of chemistry or who hold to an ideal of a “chemical-free” life (chemophobia).[6] The only familiar common usage of the term “monoxide” is in the highly toxic gas “carbon monoxide”, and the simplified term “monoxide poisoning” is commonly used to refer to poisoning by this colorless and odorless substance.[7]

The joke has been frequently extended over the years. For example, a material safety data sheet—a list of information about potentially dangerous materials used in research and industry—has been created for it.[8][9]

I’ve put this here because Dave also responded with a link:  http://www.dhmo.org/facts.html  (which does outline the supposed dangers of .... water… as a chemical)
See also:  http://www.snopes.com/science/dhmo.asp

 Signature 

SilentTone: hulitoons blog of just plain silliness?
UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are.)”  So, I AM because WE are

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 03:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6926
Joined  2005-10-21

Ah yes.. nothing like a classic.

 Signature 

1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 03:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  8381
Joined  2005-04-17

Yeah, it made news I think in 2007 the first time.  What’s really interesting is that there are a number of sites, when you Google, STILL spouting the dangers!  SO, even when many people look it up, they’re are seeing these first!

 Signature 

SilentTone: hulitoons blog of just plain silliness?
UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are.)”  So, I AM because WE are

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 09:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15019
Joined  2006-08-16

Florida country radio morning-show hosts…

As it turns out, their readers unwittingly panicked…

molecueI wasn’t really able to find any audio evidence…

So what was this? A radio show people listened to or a radio show they read?

 Signature 

Attention to detail: An apostrophe is the difference between a company that knows its shit and a company that knows it’s shit.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 April 2013 05:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  8381
Joined  2005-04-17
Tah - 09 April 2013 09:41 PM

Florida country radio morning-show hosts…

As it turns out, their readers unwittingly panicked…

molecueI wasn’t really able to find any audio evidence…

So what was this? A radio show people listened to or a radio show they read?

Wow Good call Tah! HAHAHAHA!!!

 Signature 

SilentTone: hulitoons blog of just plain silliness?
UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are.)”  So, I AM because WE are

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 April 2013 01:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5510
Joined  2007-03-14

Ignorance runs rampant in todays society.  Too many people have no interest in anything beyond the end of their nose and even less in learning anything out there.

 Signature 

Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you’re a mile away and you have their shoes.

Seen on a tshirt - “If life gives you melons you may be dyslexic”

When life hands you lemons make apple juice. Then laugh while life tries to figure out how you did it.

My blog
My Website

Profile