North Korea ‘discovers’ unicorn lair…
Posted: 30 November 2012 08:19 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Oh.. oh god.. the stupid.. it burns…

http://gizmodo.com/5964719/north-korean-archeologist-discover-the-lair-of-king-tongmyongs-unicorn-no-joke

Archeologists of the History Institute of the DPRK Academy of Social Sciences in North Korea claim they have found the “lair of the unicorn rode by King Tongmyong.” Yes, folks. A unicorn. The unicorn that their good old King used to ride back in the day.*

According to the official Korean News, King Tongmyong was the founder of the Koguryo Kingdom (277BC to 668AD). The archeologists say the unicorn’s lair “is located 200 meters from the Yongmyong Temple in Moran Hill in Pyongyang City. A rectangular rock carved with [the] words Unicorn Lair stands in front of the lair. The carved words are believed to date back to the period of Koryo Kingdom (918-1392).”

Basically, this is legitimizing the current capital as also being the historic capital, etc.

Because, you know.. big sign saying ‘Unicorn Lair’...

Sorry, can’t type. Too busy facepalming.

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2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
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4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

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Posted: 30 November 2012 09:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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George Orwell we need you now.

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Posted: 02 December 2012 11:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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(Edit) Huh, a double post?????? Sorry for that….

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J. Kruger & D. Dunning (1999), Unskilled and unaware of it: how difficulties in recognizing one’s own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments. J Pers Soc Psychol. 77, 1121-1134

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Posted: 02 December 2012 11:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Well, you have had (vice) Presidential candidates in the USA who thought that Dino’s and Humans walked together….not much less idiotic.

The posting monster is real too

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———
The Kruger-Dunning effect is rampant on internet fora.
J. Kruger & D. Dunning (1999), Unskilled and unaware of it: how difficulties in recognizing one’s own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments. J Pers Soc Psychol. 77, 1121-1134

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Posted: 04 December 2012 10:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Well, I guess it was too good to be real. Apparently another translation mistake that swept the newspapers.

Yesterday, we wrote about a story that’s been making the rounds across the blogosphere: that North Korea discovered the lair of a Kirin (or Qilin), a mythical creature often associated with the Western unicorn. However, while North Korea’s claim is about a place called Kiringul, which translates to “Kirin’s Grotto,” the government wasn’t claiming to have found proof of the existence of the mythical beast. But what they are claiming still raises a few archaeological eyebrows.

Sixiang Wang, a PhD student at Columbia University whose focus is Korea-China relations from the 13th to the 16th centuries, wrote in to provide some context for the announcement. North Korea actually announced this discovery in 2011, but only recently released the announcement in English. The English release poorly translated the name of a historical location, Kiringul, as “Unicorn Lair,” a very evocative name for Westerners. But in Korean history, the name Kiringul has a rather different significance. Kiringul is one of the sites associated with King Tongmyŏng, the founder of Koguryŏ, an ancient Korean kingdom. The thrust of the North Korean government’s announcement is that it claims to have discovered Kiringul, and thus to have proven that Pyongyang is the modern site of the ancient capital of Koguryŏ. ,,...’‘

Rest of the article

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Posted: 05 December 2012 08:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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In that context it’s a little like Nazi Germany’s archeological expeditions to places like Tibet, and before and during the wartime occupation, various parts of Europe, searching for evidence that their ‘master race’ and their National Socialist ideology had their roots in ancient civilisations around the world, looting anything they found useful in the process, and falsifying evidence to support fanciful, but politically convenient, theories.

http://www.academia.edu/358424/The_past_as_propaganda_totalitarian_archaeology_in_Nazi_Germany

http://www.archaeology.org/0603/abstracts/nazis.html

I suppose the same sort of thing’s happening here, coming up with legitimisation for Pyongyang being the seat of power for the whole of Korea for all of history, to reinforce the idea that the ruling party in charge of the North since the partition of Korea are the only rightful heirs to the country. Interesting for the Communist Party, who at least pretend to be a government by and for the people, to have a positive attitude to ancient kings, who were authoritarian rulers elected by nobody (sounds familiar!), but as far as I know the USSR, often an example for the North Korean state, even down to uniforms and the style of their vast military parades, also had an interesting attitude to the Tsars, rejecting the more recent ones as tyrants, but holding more ancient rulers like Peter the Great and Alexander Nevsky up as positive examples at times.

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