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Yeti DNA testing
Posted: 23 May 2012 03:45 AM   [ Ignore ]
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18160673

A UK-Swiss team will use DNA testing to investigate the origins of remains claimed to be from yeti and bigfoot.

The project will examine hair, bone and other material from a collection amassed by a Swiss biologist - and will invite submissions from elsewhere.

Many cultures relate legends of hairy, humanoid creatures that lurk in the wilds, rarely seen.

But material claimed to be from such creatures have never been subjected to modern scientific techniques.

“It’s an area that any serious academic ventures into with a deal of trepidation… It’s full of eccentric and downright misleading reports,” said Prof Bryan Sykes, from Oxford University.

The researchers will apply a systematic approach and employ the latest advances in genetic testing, aiming to publish in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

“There have been DNA tests done on alleged yetis and other such things but since then the testing techniques, particularly on hair, have improved a lot due to advances in forensic science,” the Oxford geneticist told Reuters news agency.

Modern testing could get valid results from a fragment of a shaft of hair, added Prof Sykes, who is leading the project with Michel Sartori, director of the Lausanne Museum of Zoology.

More at the link.

I thought that there had been some DNA testing before, but I could be wrong.

 

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Posted: 23 May 2012 04:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Would it be likely the origin of the Yeti myth started with some poor guy suffering from something like Hypertrichosis?

Hypertrichosis
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hypertrichosis (also called Ambras Syndrome) is an abnormal amount of hair growth on the body;[1][2] extensive cases of hypertrichosis have informally been called werewolf syndrome.[3] There are two distinct types of hypertrichosis: generalized hypertrichosis, which occurs over the entire body, and localized hypertrichosis, which is restricted to a certain area.[1] Hypertrichosis can be either congenital (present at birth) or acquired later in life.[3][4] The excess growth of hair occurs in areas of the skin with the exception of androgen-dependent hair of the pubic area, face, and axillary regions

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I’m an Oxy-Moron!

Mental Giant: A very tall person who is more than slightly confused.

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