49 of 52
49
CieAura: Is this the latest SCAM following in the LifeWave footsteps?
Posted: 28 April 2011 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 529 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  61098
Joined  2005-04-14
Cieaura RULES - 28 April 2011 04:37 AM

M ?

Heh.  My online connection was a bit flakey when I posted my comment, and apparently it only decided to post the very first letter of it.

So. . .ummm. . .meditate upon the power of the letter “M”!  For it is the vibrational frequency of the molar weight of the CieAura things that makes them work!  Yeah!

 Signature 

“If any man wish to write in a clear style, let him be first clear in his thoughts.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 April 2011 05:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 530 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  44
Joined  2010-01-24
Peter - 28 April 2011 01:04 PM

Can we come up with a profile of the personality type that tries to make money from scams like these?

It seems like the driving force is to make money. There seems to be no regard for not providing any kind of value to the consumer. From what I can see it’s almost like some of them are unaware of the bad image they give themselves. Can we assume people like this find themselves supporting scams because they don’t have the confidence in themselves to find legitimate ways of making money?

In the case of my cousin, she’s middle-aged, married with one child, lives in Texas, goes to church, votes Republican, and apparently has had some experience with law education. When she first approached me a couple years back about “these amazing health and energy chips” she’d been introduced to, I was willing to see what it was all about (I’m kind of a fringe type with a healthy interest in the paranormal etc). But as soon as I started looking into the company, red flags started popping up almost immediately. And when I shared my doubts with her, she rebutted with the usual “until you’ve tried them yourself, you won’t know” routine. In fairness, I did perform my due diligence, and needless to say realized that this was simply the placebo effect at work and nothing more. I presented my argument intelligently and with respect, but I suspect at that point she was already in too deep and she pretty much rejected all of my criticisms. I’ve always known her to have a great sense of humor and a feisty, take-no-crap attitude but her insistence on selling these stickers and praising the “tech” involved in their operation simply confounds me. I think she got into the program when she got pregnant, probably as a way to help supplement her family income in anticipation of her first born, which is understandable. But I’ve never been able to understand how, when faced with common sense critical thinking arguments why CieAura is full of shit, she simply keeps on with the keepin’ on and continues to participate in the program. Another of life’s great mysteries I guess!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 April 2011 06:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 531 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  38
Joined  2010-09-21
gridbug - 28 April 2011 09:32 PM
Peter - 28 April 2011 01:04 PM

Can we come up with a profile of the personality type that tries to make money from scams like these?


It seems like the driving force is to make money. 

> THAT’S IT !

But I’ve never been able to understand how, when faced with common sense critical thinking arguments why CieAura is full of shit, she simply keeps on with the keepin’ on and continues to participate in the program. Another of life’s great mysteries I guess!

> YOU ANSWERED THAT YOURSELF IN THE FIRST SENTENCE.

 


Doctor Hoffenkoff told me that when he looks at his insight statistics, all of his videos show that they are watched completely to the end(way above the average you-tube video), in fact some parts are being rewound and watched again….... Except for the one when he says you can’t make money in MLM. The graphs show that the very moment he makes that statement, it drops to almost 0%.

Either the people watching already know that and don’t have to be convinced -or- they are just too greedy to believe it. The thought of being rich beyond their wildest dreams gives them tunnel vision.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2011 04:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 532 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2865
Joined  2005-06-15
Cieaura RULES - 28 April 2011 10:06 PM
gridbug - 28 April 2011 09:32 PM
Peter - 28 April 2011 01:04 PM

Can we come up with a profile of the personality type that tries to make money from scams like these?


It seems like the driving force is to make money. 

> THAT’S IT !

But I’ve never been able to understand how, when faced with common sense critical thinking arguments why CieAura is full of shit, she simply keeps on with the keepin’ on and continues to participate in the program. Another of life’s great mysteries I guess!

> YOU ANSWERED THAT YOURSELF IN THE FIRST SENTENCE.

 


Doctor Hoffenkoff told me that when he looks at his insight statistics, all of his videos show that they are watched completely to the end(way above the average you-tube video), in fact some parts are being rewound and watched again….... Except for the one when he says you can’t make money in MLM. The graphs show that the very moment he makes that statement, it drops to almost 0%.

Either the people watching already know that and don’t have to be convinced -or- they are just too greedy to believe it. The thought of being rich beyond their wildest dreams gives them tunnel vision.

Yes but most businesses provide a good or service that brings value to the people who buy them. These businesses are run by people who acknowledge that the way to stay in business and make good profits in the long run is to provide a good or service that is fit for purpose.

People who run scams by and large don’t seem to have this mindset. They don’t provide a good or service that gives benefit to people. They just tell lies so they can take people’s money. I have to ask about these large scale scams and how many people just churn through them. How many people get caught out after not being able to sustain it in the long term? How many people manage to make money over some years? What sort of personality can live with robbing people of their money in return for something that does not work? What kind of person can try to make money this way without seeing the risks involved?

 Signature 

I’m not some ordinary moron.
I’m an Oxy-Moron!

Mental Giant: A very tall person who is more than slightly confused.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2011 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 533 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  10731
Joined  2008-02-21

Except that most people involved with selling these to their friends/family/etc aren’t your typical “scammer”.  They are, instead, “true believers’.  For whatever reason, these chips seem to work for them.  They don’t understand placebo effects, and couldn’t care less why they work, they are just glad that they work.  And so they offer them to everyone around them.  The fact that they make a little money as well is just icing on the cake.  Blinded by things like ‘confirmation bias”, they literally do not hear the negative facts/logic.  Instead, they pick and sort through information they are given and take out only those things that already support their position.

And Gridbug,

“> YOU ANSWERED THAT YOURSELF IN THE FIRST SENTENCE.”

Good thing YOU aren’t suffering from any such stereotyping beliefs, huh? rolleyes

 Signature 

“Always, I Do What Is Necessary” - Rissa Kerguelen
Go to my Blog. It’s lonely.

I Am Still The Black Swan Of Trespass On Alien Waters
To the believer no proof is required; to the skeptic no proof is sufficient.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2011 11:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 534 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2865
Joined  2005-06-15
daveprime - 29 April 2011 02:51 PM

Except that most people involved with selling these to their friends/family/etc aren’t your typical “scammer”.  They are, instead, “true believers’.  For whatever reason, these chips seem to work for them.  They don’t understand placebo effects, and couldn’t care less why they work, they are just glad that they work.  And so they offer them to everyone around them.  The fact that they make a little money as well is just icing on the cake.  Blinded by things like ‘confirmation bias”, they literally do not hear the negative facts/logic.  Instead, they pick and sort through information they are given and take out only those things that already support their position.

And Gridbug,

“> YOU ANSWERED THAT YOURSELF IN THE FIRST SENTENCE.”

Good thing YOU aren’t suffering from any such stereotyping beliefs, huh? rolleyes

Could these “true believers” be divided up into those who just want an income “at all costs” and into those who “believe”. Or do you think it’s all just one homogenous group of “true believers”?

 Signature 

I’m not some ordinary moron.
I’m an Oxy-Moron!

Mental Giant: A very tall person who is more than slightly confused.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2011 02:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 535 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  38
Joined  2010-09-21
Peter - 29 April 2011 03:50 PM

Could these “true believers” be divided up into those who just want an income “at all costs” and into those who “believe”. Or do you think it’s all just one homogenous group of “true believers”?

If it wasn’t for the money, why would it even be offered as a MLM opportunity, and why else would they be tempted to try it in the first place?

If Transparent Holographic Pain chips were offered at Walgreen’s, how many purchased would be returned for their money back?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2011 02:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 536 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  10731
Joined  2008-02-21
Cieaura RULES - 29 April 2011 06:18 PM
Peter - 29 April 2011 03:50 PM

Could these “true believers” be divided up into those who just want an income “at all costs” and into those who “believe”. Or do you think it’s all just one homogenous group of “true believers”?

If it wasn’t for the money, why would it even be offered as a MLM opportunity, and why else would they be tempted to try it in the first place?

If Transparent Holographic Pain chips were offered at Walgreen’s, how many purchased would be returned for their money back?

You might be surprised. wink

Many people see benefit from a plethora of home remedies, ‘ancient’ cures, and nonsensical actions/unguents.

I personally believe that only a small percentage of those using/selling the “chips” are in it purely for profit.  Like most people, most users found something that seems to work and want to help others.  the fact they can make a few bucks is a bonus. And for people in pain, easy money itself is remarkably curative. grin (I believe in the basic goodness of mankind, though, so I may be mistaken.) LOL

 Signature 

“Always, I Do What Is Necessary” - Rissa Kerguelen
Go to my Blog. It’s lonely.

I Am Still The Black Swan Of Trespass On Alien Waters
To the believer no proof is required; to the skeptic no proof is sufficient.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2011 03:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 537 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  38
Joined  2010-09-21

Have you ever seen the videos of his Seminars? Or any MLM seminars….People actually PAY to go to them. I doubt if any of them go because the product makes them feel better. They go so they can see the celebrities.To join the classes on how to improve their sales, get motivated and learn about their chances of winning a Caribbean Cruise. Heck, if they would just save the money instead of letting the company charge their CC on a monthly Auto-Ship, they would have enough to buy TWO cruises.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 April 2011 01:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 538 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2865
Joined  2005-06-15
daveprime - 29 April 2011 06:47 PM
Cieaura RULES - 29 April 2011 06:18 PM
Peter - 29 April 2011 03:50 PM

Could these “true believers” be divided up into those who just want an income “at all costs” and into those who “believe”. Or do you think it’s all just one homogenous group of “true believers”?

If it wasn’t for the money, why would it even be offered as a MLM opportunity, and why else would they be tempted to try it in the first place?

If Transparent Holographic Pain chips were offered at Walgreen’s, how many purchased would be returned for their money back?

You might be surprised. wink

Many people see benefit from a plethora of home remedies, ‘ancient’ cures, and nonsensical actions/unguents.

I personally believe that only a small percentage of those using/selling the “chips” are in it purely for profit.  Like most people, most users found something that seems to work and want to help others.  the fact they can make a few bucks is a bonus. And for people in pain, easy money itself is remarkably curative. grin (I believe in the basic goodness of mankind, though, so I may be mistaken.) LOL

So if somebody comes up to me and tries to sell me something of CieAura or LifeWave how likely is it they have a sociopathic need to grab money off me even though they know their product is useless? Or is it the case they are all just misguided idiots?

 Signature 

I’m not some ordinary moron.
I’m an Oxy-Moron!

Mental Giant: A very tall person who is more than slightly confused.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 April 2011 06:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 539 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  10731
Joined  2008-02-21
Peter - 30 April 2011 05:26 AM

So if somebody comes up to me and tries to sell me something of CieAura or LifeWave how likely is it they have a sociopathic need to grab money off me even though they know their product is useless? Or is it the case they are all just misguided idiots?

Oh no!  There are some VERY low-life types involved as well.  (As there are in almost any human endeavor.)  If you said MOST are just misguided persons, i would agree. wink

 Signature 

“Always, I Do What Is Necessary” - Rissa Kerguelen
Go to my Blog. It’s lonely.

I Am Still The Black Swan Of Trespass On Alien Waters
To the believer no proof is required; to the skeptic no proof is sufficient.

Profile
 
 
   
49 of 52
49
 
‹‹ Telemarketer Hoax      Gabriel Method: Hoax? ››