The Museum of Hoaxes
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Dead Body of Loch Ness Monster Found, 1972
The Hoaxing Hitchhiker, 1941
The boy with the golden tooth, 1593
Samsung invents the on/off switch
The Olympic Underwear Relay, 1956
Lord Gordon-Gordon, robber of the robber barons, 1871
What do the lines on Solo cups mean?
Rare planetary alignment decreases gravity, 1976
The Nobody For President Campaign, 1940 to Present
Cat that walked 3000 miles to find its owners, 1951
The Death of Alan Abel, 1980
On January 2, 1980 the New York Times announced the death of Alan Abel on its obituary page. It provided a flattering account of his career. The obituary read, in part:

Alan Abel, a writer, musician and film producer who specialized in satire and lampoons, died of a heart attack yesterday at Sundance, a ski resort near Orem, Utah, while investigating a location for a new film. He was 50 years old and lived in Manhattan and Westport, Conn.

Mr. Abel, a graduate of Ohio State University with majors in music and speech, made a point in his work of challenging the obvious and uttering the outrageous. He gained national recognition several years ago when he mounted a campaign for animal decency, demanding that horses and dogs, for example, be fitted with underwear.

Unfortunately for the Times, Abel was not dead. The Times learned this when Abel held a press conference the next day in which he revealed that the news of his death was a hoax engineered by himself and a team of twelve accomplices. It is reported that the editor of the Times was so mad at the deception, that he vowed to never print Abel's name again. This was a vow the editor was unable to keep.
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