The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
Loch Ness Monster Hoaxes
The Sandpaper Test, 1960
The Case of the Vanishing Belly Button, 1964
Did Poe say 'The best things in life make you sweaty'?
Rachael Ray cooks her family and her dog
'Solar Armor' freezes man in Nevada Desert, 1874
Fake Fish Photos
The Hoaxing Hitchhiker, 1941
Lord Gordon-Gordon, robber of the robber barons, 1871
Prof. Wingard's Death Ray Hoax, 1876
Stephen Glass, 1998
During the mid-1990s, Stephen Glass was a young writer at the New Republic. He had a reputation for always getting the best scoops. For instance, in his most celebrated article, "Hack Heaven," he told the story of a fifteen-year-old hacker who broke into the computer system of a software corporation, Jukt Micronics, and then succeeded in extorting money, a job, a Miata, a trip to Disney World, and a lifetime subscription to Playboy from the company. The article captured the topsy-turvy culture of the 1990s dot-com boom. But it turned out that Jukt Micronics only existed in Glass's own imagination. The New Republic fired him in May 1998 when it found out. His career as a media hoaxer served as the basis for the 2003 film Shattered Glass, in which he was played by Hayden Christensen. External links: wikipedia, washingtonpost.com.
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