The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
 
A black lion: real or fake?
The Berners Street Hoax, 1810
Actress who claimed she was kidnapped by puritans, 1950
Dog wins art contest, 1974
The Nobody For President Campaign, 1940 to Present
Lord Gordon-Gordon, robber of the robber barons, 1871
Bonsai Kittens, 2000
Bizarre pictographs of Emmanuel Domenech, 1860
The Crown Prince Regent of Thulia, 1954
The Cradle of the Deep, a literary hoax, 1929
Nessiteras Rhombopteryx
Sir Peter Scott of the Loch Ness Phenomena Investigation Bureau participated in the 1972 expedition that produced the flipper photo. Feeling that the photo provided proof that some kind of large creature existed in the loch, he decided to give the animal a scientific name: Nessiteras Rhombopteryx (which meant "the Ness wonder with a diamond fin"). But London newspapers soon pointed out that if you juggled around the letters in this name, you got the phrase "monster hoax by Sir Peter S." Was this evidence that the flipper photo had been a deliberate hoax? Scott denied it. Dr. Rines came to his rescue by pointing out that if you juggled the letters around a bit more, you could spell "Yes, both pix are monsters. R."
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All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.