The Museum of Hoaxes
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Female thieves hide money in their bras, 1950
The Sandpaper Test, 1960
September Morn, the painting that shocked the censor, 1913
Jernegan's Gold Accumulator Scam, 1898
Snowball the Monster Cat, 2000
The Great Electric Sugar Swindle, 1884
The disumbrationist art hoax, 1924
The Nobody For President Campaign, 1940 to Present
The Cottingley Fairies, 1917
Eccentric's last prank, 66 years after his death, 1900
Critics of Catholicism receive Catholic medal -- April Fool's Day, 1925
The French government received a message from Athens, Greece, sent via official channels, announcing that three prominent Parisian critics of Catholicism had been awarded the Order of the Redeemer, the highest decoration awarded by the Greek government. The decoration is considered a high honor among Catholics, since it symbolizes the rebirth of the Greek nation through divine assistance. The three men who supposedly had been awarded the medal were M. Ferdinand Buisson and M. Aulard of the Sorbonne, and M. Victor Basch of the University of Paris. In reality, the decorations had been conferred on less controversial figures. It was not known who had found a way to use the Greek government to play such a joke. Ferdinand Buisson was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. [The Washington Post, Apr 19, 1925.]

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All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.